Los Angeles Tribune

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The Los Angeles Tribune was the name of three separate newspapers published at different times during the 19th and 20th centuries in Los Angeles, California. It was also the name of a fictional newspaper on a popular television show of the late 20th century.

Authentic[edit]

1886–1890[edit]

This newspaper was published from 1886 to 1890 by Henry H. Boyce, once a partner with Los Angeles Times publisher Harrison Gray Otis.[1]

1911–1917[edit]

The second incarnation of the Los Angeles Tribune was begun by Edwin T. Earl (1858-1919) after he had made a fortune through his invention of the refrigerated boxcar used to ship oranges from Southern California to Eastern markets. Its first issue was on July 4, 1911, and its last was on July 5, 1918.[2][3]

1941–1960[edit]

Almena Lomax, a civil rights activist, began the Los Angeles Tribune between 1941 and 1960, for principally the African-American residents of Los Angeles. The paper was known for its "fearless reporting," including articles about racism in the Los Angeles Police Department.[4]

Fictional[edit]

The Los Angeles Tribune was the name of a fictional newspaper that was the principal setting for Lou Grant, a popular American television show that ran from 1977 to 1982.[5]
The Los Angeles Tribune was the name of a fictional newspaper read by Remington Steele, in episode 1-07 of the TV show by the same name that ran from 1982 to 1987.[6]
The Los Angeles Tribune was the name of a fictional newspaper seen in episode 1.14 (The Snow Queen Part 2) of the TV show Hunter which aired from 1984-1991.[7]

References[edit]