Louisiana state elections, 2007

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Louisiana's 2007 state elections were held on October 20, 2007, with runoff elections held on November 17. All statewide elected offices were up, as well as all seats in the Louisiana State Legislature.

Republicans were successful in electing the country's first Indian-American governor, Congressman Bobby Jindal. The issue of the state's response to Hurricane Katrina played a large part in the decision of incumbent governor Kathleen Blanco to retire rather than seek a second term in office. Term limits also caused a large number of retirements in the state legislature, which proved to be a benefit to Republicans, who made gains in both houses.

Governor[edit]

Bobby Jindal was elected outright with 54%, over a number of other contenders. He was voted Louisiana's new governor.

Lieutenant governor[edit]

Democratic incumbent Mitch Landrieu had the best showing of any Democrat running statewide, winning 56.6% of the vote. He was opposed by two Republicans, country musician Sammy Kershaw and State Representative Gary Beard, and by two Independents, Norris "Spanky" Gros Jr. and Thomas D. Kates.

Open Primary Results[edit]

2007 Louisiana Lieutenant Governor election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Mitch Landrieu (incumbent) 701,887 56.6
Republican Sammy Kershaw 375,727 30.3
Republican Gary Beard 130,876 10.6
Independent Norris "Spanky" Gros Jr. 15,965 1.3
Independent Thomas D. Kates 15,555 1.2
Turnout 1,240,010

Attorney general[edit]

Incumbent Attorney General Charles Foti was challenged by both a Democrat, James "Buddy" Caldwell, and a Republican, Royal Alexander. Foti placed third in the open primary, leading to a runoff between Caldwell and Alexander, in which Caldwell easily won.

Open Primary Results[edit]

2007 Louisiana Attorney General election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic James "Buddy" Caldwell 434,507 35.6
Republican Royal Alexander 395,498 32.4
Democratic Charles Foti (incumbent) 389,300 31.9
Turnout 1,219,305

Runoff Results[edit]

2007 Louisiana Attorney General election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic James "Buddy" Caldwell 477,574 66.6
Republican Royal Alexander 239,485 33.4

Commissioner of Agriculture and Forestry[edit]

Longtime incumbent Democrat Bob Odom faced his toughest re-election campaign ever, winning only 41% of the vote and ending up into a runoff with Republican State Representative Michael G. Strain. Odom withdrew from the runoff, making Strain the winner by default.

Open Primary Results[edit]

2007 Louisiana Commissioner of Agriculture and Forestry election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bob Odom (incumbent) 505,504 41.3
Republican Mike Strain 494,760 40.5
Republican Wayne Carter 152,893 12.5
Republican Don Johnson 69,470 5.7
Turnout 1,222,627

Commissioner of Insurance[edit]

Republican Jim Donelon, who was elected to the Insurance Commissioner post in a 2006 special election, defeated both Democrat Jim Crowley and Republicans Robert Lansden and Jerilyn Schneider-Kneale to win a full term.

Open Primary Results[edit]

2007 Louisiana Commissioner of Insurance election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jim Donelon (incumbent) 606,196 50.9
Democratic Jim Crowley 423,986 35.6
Republican Robert Lansden 105,991 8.9
Republican Jerilyn Schneider-Kneale 55,350 4.6
Turnout 1,191,523

Secretary of State[edit]

Republican incumbent Jay Dardenne, after winning a special election in 2006, easily defeated Democrat R. Wooley and Libertarian Scott A. Lewis III to win a full term.

Open Primary Results[edit]

2007 Louisiana Secretary of State election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jay Dardenne (incumbent) 757,821 63.3
Democratic R. Wooley 374,199 31.3
Libertarian Scott A. Lewis III 64,723 5.4
Turnout 1,196,743

State Treasurer[edit]

Incumbent John Neely Kennedy, a Democrat who switched to the Republican party in 2007, was re-elected unopposed.

State legislature[edit]

Louisiana Senate[edit]

In the open primary election, Democrats won a total of 22 seats, including both seats won outright and runoffs between two Democrats. Republicans won 12 seats outright with one runoff. In the runoff elections between a Democrat and a Republican, each party won two seats, making the post-election composition of the Senate 24 Democrats and 15 Republicans. Following the elections, Democratic State Sen. Robert Adley switched to the Republican party, making the Senate 23 Democrats and 16 Republicans [1].

House of Representatives[edit]

In the open primary, Democrats won a guaranteed 45 seats: 34 outright, with 11 runoffs between two Democrats. Republicans won a guaranteed 42 seats: 30 outright, with 12 runoffs between two Republicans. One independent was also elected. The remaining 17 seats went to runoffs, including 16 between a Democrat and a Republican and one between a Democrat and an Independent. Democrats and Republicans each won eight of these seats, with the last going to an Independent, giving the Democrats a slim 53 to 50, with two Independents, majority in the House of Representatives.

External links[edit]