Lowell Green

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Lowell Green
Born (1936-07-07) 7 July 1936 (age 78)
Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
Show The Lowell Green Show (also known as The Island of Sanity)
Station(s) CFRA Ottawa
Time slot Weekdays 10 am to 12pm
Style talk radio
Country  Canada
Website [1]

Lowell Green (born 7 July 1936) is a Canadian radio personality.[1] He hosts The Lowell Green Show, a conservative morning talk show on Ottawa radio station CFRA, and has also syndicated programming to several other Canadian radio stations.

Green was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States, to Canadian parents, and immigrated to Canada.

Green graduated from Macdonald Agricultural College of McGill University near Montreal in 1956. He started his radio career in Brantford, Ontario, subsequently moving to stations in Sudbury and Montreal. In Montreal, Green won awards for his coverage of the Springhill mining disaster in Nova Scotia.[2]

Green arrived at CFRA in 1960 as a news and farm reporter. In 1966, he began hosting Greenline, and eventually became the longest-running open line talk show host in North America. He retired briefly from radio in the 1980s, but returned in 1990.

He attempted to win the Liberal party nomination for the Pontiac riding in the 1968 federal election but lost this bid to Thomas Lefebvre.[3]

On 13 December 1984, Green ran for the Ontario Liberal Party in a provincial by-election in Ottawa Centre. The by-election was called after NDP Michael Cassidy resigned his seat. He came third, losing to NDP candidate Evelyn Gigantes. Green blamed this loss on his "sharp" personality and low voter turnout.[4]

In 1993, Green returned to CFRA, and has hosted The Lowell Green Show ever since.

Green has been controversial at times. Several complaints have been made against him to the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council. In a 1994 complaint to the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council, listeners alleged that Green had been rude and abusive to a caller who identified herself as a Christian. Although the CBSC determined that Green's conduct had contravened CBSC guidelines around discrimination, they also decided that the station had responded appropriately, and the group did not prescribe any further action. In 2006 and 2008, the council censured Green for his treatment of Muslims man who challenged Green on the way the radio show host portrays Islam.[5][6]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Death in October. Renfrew, Ontario: General Store, 1996. ISBN 1-894439-19-8
  • The Pork Chop and Other Stories: A Memoir. Carp, Ontario: Creative Bound Resources, 2005. ISBN 1-894439-19-8
  • How the Granola-crunching, Tree-hugging Thug Huggers are Wrecking Our Country! Carp, Ontario: Creative Bound Resources, 2006. ISBN 1-894439-30-9
  • It’s Hard to Say Goodbye. Carp, Ontario: Creative Bound Resources, 2007. ISBN 1-894439-37-6
  • Hoodwinked Carp, Ontario: Spruce Ridge, 2009. ISBN 978-0-9813149-0-7
  • Mayday. Mayday: curb immigration and stop multiculturalism, or it's the end of the Canada we know. Carp, Ontario: Spruce Ridge, 2010. ISBN 978-0-9813149-1-4
  • Here's proof only we conservatives have our heads screwed on straight Carp, Ontario: Spruce Ridge, 2011. ISBN 978-0-9813149-2-1

Electoral record[edit]

Template:Ontario provincial by-election, 13 December 1984/Ottawa Centre

References[edit]

  1. ^ Egan, Kelly (7 October 2005). "Imagine Lowell Green stoned: Then think about farm animals". Ottawa Citizen. p. F1. 
  2. ^ "Lowell Green profile". CFRA Radio. Retrieved 2007-03-27. 
  3. ^ The Canadian Press (22 May 1968). "Losers Say Nomination Undemocratic". Montreal: The Gazette. p. 47. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  4. ^ Ward, Bruce; Hanna, Susan (14 December 1984). "Battered Grits lose seat to PCs". Ottawa Citizen. pp. A1, A12. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  5. ^ http://www.cbsc.ca/english/decisions/2009/090206a.php
  6. ^ http://www.cbsc.ca/english/decisions/2006/061215.php

External links[edit]