Mangyongbong-92

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Mangyongbong-92
Mangyongbong-92.jpg
Mangyongbong-92 at Wonsan in 2010
Chosŏn'gŭl 만경봉 92호
Hancha 萬景峰 92號
Revised Romanization Man-gyeongbong 92(gusibi)-ho
McCune–Reischauer Man'gyŏngbong kusibi ho

The Mangyongbong-92, named after a hill near Pyongyang, is a passenger ferry built in 1992 to celebrate the North Korean leader, Kim Il Sung's 80th birthday. The ferry was built with funds from Chongryon, the pro-Pyongyang General Association of Korean Residents in Japan. It is the only direct connection between North Korea and Japan.[1]

School children pass Mangyongbong-92 in North Korea.

Transport[edit]

The ferry makes 20 to 30 trips per annum between Niigata, Japan and Wonsan, North Korea. A typical journey lasts about 28 hours. It is mainly used by Zainichi Koreans visiting relatives in North Korea, and for school trips by Korean schools in Japan.

Controversy[edit]

In 2003, the ferry became an object of suspicion in Japan [1], with allegations that it was being used to transport North Korea's missile parts, made by a North Korean defector to a US Senate committee. The allegations were denied by So Chung-on, the head of Chongryon's foreign affairs bureau, and so far remain unsubstantiated.[2]

Japanese Ban[edit]

On July 5, 2006, Japan banned the ferry from entry because North Korea test-fired Taepodong-2 missiles which fell into the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea according to the North Korean government).[3]

That same year, a North Korean defector testified before the United States Senate saying that 90% of the parts North Korea was using to assemble this missile was transferred from Japan via the Mangyongong-92.[4]

Specifications[edit]

  • Weight: 9,672 tonnes
  • Length: 162.1 m
  • Width: 20.5 m
  • Speed: 23 knots
  • No. of Passengers: 220

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mangyongbong 92, A North Korean Ferry". InterQ, a subsidiary of GMO Internet Group LLC. 2001-08-04. 
  2. ^ Buckley, Sarah (2003-06-09). "N Korea ferry struggling against the tide". BBC News. Retrieved 2010-06-15. 
  3. ^ "Seventh missile launched: report". Sydney Morning Herald. 2006-07-04. 
  4. ^ Buckley, Sarah (2003-06-09). "N Korea ferry struggling against the tide". BBC News. Retrieved 2010-06-15.