Mass Effect: Redemption

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Mass Effect: Redemption
#1 cover art by Daryl Mandryk
Publication information
Publisher Dark Horse Comics
Schedule Irregular
Format Limited series
Genre
Publication date January – April 2010
Number of issues 4
Creative team
Writer(s) Mac Walters
John Jackson Miller
Artist(s) Omar Francia
Daryl Mandryk (covers)
Colorist(s) Michael Atiyeh
Collected editions
Hardcover ISBN 978-1-59582-481-3
Mass Effect series in-universe chronology

Mass Effect: Redemption is a four-part comic book mini-series.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] Set in the Mass Effect universe, Redemption takes place two years before the events of the video game Mass Effect 2.[1][2]

Publication history[edit]

Print editions[edit]

Mass Effect: Redemption was revealed on July 21, 2009. It will be a four-issue mini-series based on the Mass Effect video games. The comic will be published by Dark Horse Comics and is written by Mac Walters, who was a lead writer for Mass Effect, with scripting by John Jackson Miller and art by Omar Francia, both of whom have previously worked on Star Wars related comics.[1]

Issue Date Pages Creators
1 6 January 2010[3] 32[3] Writers: Mac Walters, John Jackson Miller
Artist: Omar Francia
Colorist: Michael Atiyeh
Cover Artist: Daryl Mandryk[3]
2 3 February 2010[4] 32[4] Writers: Mac Walters, John Jackson Miller
Artist: Omar Francia
Colorist: Michael Atiyeh
Cover Artist: Daryl Mandryk[4]
3 3 March 2010[5] 32[5] Writers: Mac Walters, John Jackson Miller
Artist: Omar Francia
Colorist: Michael Atiyeh
Cover Artist: Daryl Mandryk[5]
4 7 April 2010[6] 32[6] Writers: Mac Walters, John Jackson Miller
Artist: Omar Francia
Colorist: Michael Atiyeh
Cover Artist: Daryl Mandryk[6]

Digital editions[edit]

All four print issues were released digitally on April 20, 2011.[7][8][9][10]

Plot[edit]

The events of Mass Effect: Redemption tie-in to downloadable content that was produced for Mass Effect 2 titled "Lair of the Shadow Broker". According to Mac Walters, the comic mini-series will be "expanding on characters that we didn't really explore in [the first] Mass Effect and also looking at opportunities to expand on them even further in the DLC.[1]

The narrative in Redemption begins with Commander Shepard mysteriously disappearing in the Terminus Systems, out of contact with the SSV Normandy and its crew. Both the Shadow Broker (working for the Collectors) and Liara T'Soni (helping Cerberus) are to find and retrieve the dead body of Commander Shepard. Just as Tazzik, an agent of the Shadow Broker wants to turn over the corpse to the Collectors, Liara manages to capture it, with the help of the drell Feron, who is captured in the process, and turn it over to Cerberus, hoping that they may be able to revive Shepard.[citation needed]

Reception[edit]

The comic received generally positive reviews. Game Informer's Andrew Reiner heavily praised the first issue, favouring the pacing over that of the first game but still enjoying the character and universe development. Although he felt Liara was likeable, he believed the Illusive Man and the Collectors "[stole] the spotlight".[11] Jesse Schedeen, of IGN, gave the first issue an 8 out of 10, praising the supporting cast and the script; however, Schedeen felt Francia's art did not quite reach Mass Effect's aesthetic and did not offer a "complete visual package".[12] Miguel Perez reviewed the future issues for IGN and was less positive: the second scored a 7.9,[13] the third a 6.5,[14] and the fourth and final a 6.2.[15]

Matt Miller of Game Informer would go on to list the comic of one of "seven great video game comics", together with Evolution, though he called the ending "unsatisfying". Miller praised the involvement of Mass Effect 2 lead writer Mac Walters;[16] IGN's Schedeen and Rich George echoed the praise for including the lead writer, compared to other video game comics.[17] Paul Furfari of UGO listed Redemption as "required reading" for Mass Effect 2, calling it "more than essential" for lore fans and completionists.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Schedeen, Jesse (21 July 2009). "Mass Effect Comes to Comics". IGN. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Mass Effect Explodes Into Comics!". Dark Horse Comics. 21 July 2009. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Mass Effect: Redemption #1". Dark Horse Comics. 6 January 2010. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Mass Effect: Redemption #2". Dark Horse Comics. 3 February 2010. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Mass Effect: Redemption #3". Dark Horse Comics. 3 March 2010. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Mass Effect: Redemption #4". Dark Horse Comics. 7 April 2010. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "Mass Effect: Redemption #1". Dark Horse Comics. 20 April 2011. Retrieved 7 April 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "Mass Effect: Redemption #2". Dark Horse Comics. 20 April 2011. Retrieved 7 April 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Mass Effect: Redemption #3". Dark Horse Comics. 20 April 2011. Retrieved 7 April 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Mass Effect: Redemption #4". Dark Horse Comics. 20 April 2011. Retrieved 7 April 2013. 
  11. ^ Andrew Reiner (6 January 2010). "A Must-Read For Mass Effect Fans". Game Informer. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  12. ^ Jesse Schedeen (6 January 2010). "Mass Effect: Redemption #1 Review". IGN. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  13. ^ Miguel Perez (3 February 2010). "Mass Effect: Redemption #2 Review". IGN. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  14. ^ Miguel Perez (3 March 2010). "Mass Effect: Redemption #3 Review". IGN. Retrieved 14 June 2013. 
  15. ^ Miguel Perez (7 April 2010). "Mass Effect: Redemption #4 Review". IGN. Retrieved 14 June 2013. 
  16. ^ Matt Miller (21 July 2011). "Seven Great Video Game Comics". Game Informer. Retrieved 15 June 2013. 
  17. ^ Rich George; Jesse Schedeen (25 June 2010). "Why Videogame Comics Suck". IGN. Retrieved 15 June 2013. 
  18. ^ Paul Furfari (27 January 2010). "Required Reading: Mass Effect 2". UGO. Archived from the original on 15 June 2013. Retrieved 15 June 2013. 

External links[edit]