Michael Shur

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For the television producer, see Michael Schur.

Michael Shur (born November 13, 1942) is an American physicist, the Patricia W. and C. Sheldon Roberts '48 professor of solid state electronics and an electrical engineering professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Background[edit]

Shur was born on November 13, 1942 in Kamensk-Uralsky, Sverdlovsk, USSR.[1] He received his masters degree in Electrical Engineering from St. Petersburg Electrotechnical Institute. In 1967 he received his PhD in physics from the A.F. Ioffe Institute in Petersburg, Russia.[2]

Shur has held research or faculty positions at the A.F. Ioffe Institute, Wayne State University, Oakland University, Cornell University, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, and the University of Minnesota. From 1989 to 1996, he was the John Money Professor at the University of Virginia, where he served as the director of the Applied Electrophysics Laboratories in 1996.[2] He moved to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1996.

Research[edit]

Shur has led many research efforts in diverse fields related to semiconductor devices, solid-state physics, and engineering, such as plasma wave electronics, thin film transistors, laser technology, sub micrometre field effect transistors, terahertz technology, Surface Acoustic and Acousto-Optic devices. Having written over 1,000 technical publications, the Institute for Scientific Information, an organization which tracks citations, lists him as one of the most quoted researchers in his field. He has also authored, co-authored, or served as editor for 32 books. As of 2004, he holds 27 patents for a wide variety of microelectronic innovations.

Awards and honors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marquis Who's Who. 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "CIE Faculty Page". Retrieved 7 September 2010. 
  3. ^ "IEEE Donald G. Fink Prize Paper Award Recipients". IEEE. Retrieved January 2, 2011. 
  4. ^ "IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award Recipients". IEEE. Retrieved January 10, 2011. 

External links[edit]