Midwestern Baptist College

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Midwestern Baptist College
Established 1953
Type Private/Not accredited
President David M. Carr
Dean Joseph Fortna
Students 60
Location

3400 Morgan Road
Orion

(From 1953 to 2010 located in Pontiac), Michigan, United States
Mascot Falcons
Website http://www.midwesternbaptistcollege.net

Midwestern Baptist College, formally known as Midwestern Bible College, is an unaccredited[1] higher education institution in Orion, Michigan.

In 1953, the school was founded in Pontiac, Michigan by Tom Malone Sr. as a liberal arts college, which included a Baptist seminary on more than 55 acres (220,000 m2).[2] It specializes in Christian theological doctrine. Malone wanted to offer a faith-based education including both academics and morals. The college also stressed being a moral compass, to "abstain from all appearances of evil", and fulfilling the Great Commission.[citation needed]

For the fall semester of 2010, Midwestern planned to move from Pontiac, Michigan to the property of Shalom Baptist Church in Orion Township, Michigan.[3]

Education[edit]

Midwestern Baptist College is not accredited by any accreditation body recognized by its country. According to the US Department of Education, unaccredited degrees and credits might not be acceptable to employers or other institutions, and use of degree titles may be restricted or illegal in some jurisdictions.[4] Some of the school's courses are accepted for transfer credit at nearby Oakland Community College.[5]

The highest degree the college awards is the Bachelor of Religious Education (B.R.E.) or Bachelor of Sacred Music (B.S.M.).[6] The school also offers Associates Degree in Music, Commercial Subjects, and Biblical Studies.[6]

Alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Accreditation database from U.S. Department of Education
  2. ^ "Education goals". Midwestern Baptist College & Seminary. 2009. Retrieved 2009-08-19. 
  3. ^ "Welcome". Midwestern Baptist College & Seminary. 2010. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  4. ^ "Educational accreditation". US Department of Education. 
  5. ^ http://www.oaklandcc.edu/transfer/ (accessed June 20, 2007)
  6. ^ a b "Education goals". Midwestern Baptist College. 2006. Retrieved 2006-12-19. 
  7. ^ "Chuck Baldwin: A Biographical Sketch". Constitution Party of Texas. Retrieved 2008-10-20. 

External links[edit]