Mowbray and Uffinger

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For the Bermudian naturalist, see Louis L. Mowbray.

Mowbray and Uffinger comprised an architectural partnership in New York City formed in 1895. Known for bank buildings and as vault engineers they designed over 400 banks in the pre-World War II era throughout the country. The principals were Louis Montayne Mowbray (1867-1921) and Justin Maximo Uffinger Sr. (1871-1948).

Louis Montayne Mowbray was born 1867 in New York. A September 27, 1883, article in The New York Times stated that he had been admitted to the US Naval Academy. Mowbray married Anna Scott. He died in New York in June 1921.

Justin Maximo Uffinger Sr. was born May 7, 1871, in New York City to German immigrants. He was born Justus Maximo Ueffinger but changed his name about the time of his marriage in 1905 to Marion I. Hoag. He began studies at the City College of New York at age 13 and completed his studies in engineering and architecture at Cooper Union in 1891. He articled for renowned architect Richard Morris Hunt while at Cooper Union and until 1895 when he formed a partnership with Mowbray. By 1910 the family was living in Summit, New Jersey. He had two sons, Justin M. Uffinger Jr. and Donald Hoag Uffinger.

After Mowbray’s death, the firm continued under its previous name until 1927, when it was reorganized as Uffinger, Foster, and Bookwalter. Justin Uffinger would retire in 1930 but continued to work as a consultant, as late as, 1940. He died in Summit, New Jersey on November 24, 1948.

Notable commissions[edit]

All are extant unless otherwise specified. In chronological order:

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Donnelly, Lu; Brumble IV, H. David; Toker, Franklin (2010). Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania. Charlottesville, Virginia: University of Virginia Press. p. 174. ISBN 978-0-8139-2823-4. 
  2. ^ Donnelly, Lu; Brumble IV, H. David; Toker, Franklin (2010). Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania. Charlottesville, Virginia: University of Virginia Press. p. 330. ISBN 978-0-8139-2823-4. 
  3. ^ "Altoona Trust Company Building". Historic American Building Surveys (HABS) / Built in America. Library of Congress. Retrieved 2011-02-15. 
  4. ^ "First National Bank Building". Historic American Building Surveys (HABS) / Built in America. Library of Congress. Retrieved 2011-02-15. 
  5. ^ Donnelly, Lu; Brumble IV, H. David; Toker, Franklin (2010). Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania. Charlottesville, Virginia: University of Virginia Press. p. 389. ISBN 978-0-8139-2823-4. 
  6. ^ Breiner, David M. (1994-07-19). "Dime Savings Bank" (PDF). Landmarks Preservation Commission, City of New York. Retrieved 2011-02-15. 
  7. ^ Morrone, Francis (2001). "Dime Savings Bank". An Architectural Guidebook to Brooklyn. Layton, Utah: Gibbs Smith, Publisher. pp. 8–11. ISBN 1-58685-047-4. Retrieved 2011-02-15. 
  8. ^ Wood, Wayne (1992). "D-58: Atlantic National Bank Building". Jacksonville's Architectural Heritage (University Press of Florida): 61. ISBN 0-8130-0953-7. Retrieved November 7, 2011. 
  9. ^ Ennis Davis (March 6, 2008). "A Century of Florida's Tallest Skyscrapers". metrojacksonville.com. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  10. ^ Sullivan, Mary Ann (2009). "Savannah, Georgia: 26 East Gaston Street or Mills Bee Lane House". Digital Imaging Project - MAS/BC. Retrieved 2011-10-05. 
  11. ^ Spector, Tom (1993). The Guide to the Architecture of Georgia. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press. p. 19. ISBN 0-87249-856-5. Retrieved 2011-02-16. 
  12. ^ Spector, Tom (1993). The Guide to the Architecture of Georgia. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press. p. 20. ISBN 0-87249-856-5. Retrieved 2011-02-16.