National Film Preservation Act

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The National Film Preservation Act is the name of several federal laws relating to the identification, acquisition, storage, and dissemination of "films that are culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Legislative history[edit]

1988[edit]

The original National Film Preservation Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-446) was part of an appropriations bill for the United States Department of the Interior. The law specified three tasks:

  1. Directs the Librarian of Congress to establish a National Film Registry to register films that are culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.
  2. Prohibits any person from knowingly distributing or exhibiting to the public a film that has been materially altered, or a black and white film that has been colorized and is included in the Registry, unless such films are labeled disclosing specified information.
  3. Directs the Librarian to establish in the Library of Congress a National Film Preservation Board."[1]

1992[edit]

The National Film Preservation Act of 1992 reauthorized the National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) for four years (Public Law 102-307) and added the requirement for the Librarian of Congress to "study and report to the Congress on the current state of film preservation and restoration activities, including the activities of the Library of Congress and other major film archives in the United States; and (2) establish a comprehensive national film preservation program for motion pictures, in conjunction with other film archivists and copyright owners." [2]

1996[edit]

The National Film Preservation Act of 1996 reauthorized the NFPB for an additional seven years (Public Law 104-285), and also created the National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF) as a charitable organization, although the NFPF is not a government agency.[3]

2005[edit]

The National Film Preservation Act of 2005 reauthorized both the NFPB and the NFPF (Public Law 109-009) for an additional four years.[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Public Law 100-446 on thomas.loc.gov
  2. ^ Public Law 102-307 on thomas.loc.gov
  3. ^ Public Law 104-285 on thomas.loc.gov
  4. ^ Public Law 109-009 on thomas.loc.gov

External links[edit]