Nepean—Carleton

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Nepean—Carleton
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario electoral district
Ottawa-nepeancarleton.PNG
Nepean—Carleton in relation to other electoral districts in Ottawa
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Pierre Poilievre
Conservative
District created 1976
First contested 1979
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 159,032
Electors (2011) 103,414
Area (km²)[2] 1,128.05
Pop. density (per km²) 141
Census divisions Ottawa
Census subdivisions Ottawa
For the provincial electoral district see Nepean—Carleton (provincial electoral district)

Nepean—Carleton is a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons from 1979 to 1988 and since 1997.

It includes the southern portion of the former city of Nepean and adjacent suburban and rural areas of west and southern Ottawa.

Geography[edit]

Nepean—Carleton consists of the part of the City of Ottawa lying east and south of a line drawn from the southwestern city limit, northeast along the southeast limit of the former Township of Goulbourn, northwest along McCordick Road and Eagleson Road to the southern limit of the former City of Kanata, then along the southern and eastern limits of Kanata, northwest along Eagleson Road, northeast along Highway 417, southwest along Richmond Road, east along the Canadian National Railway, southeast along Merivale Road, east along West Hunt Club Road, south along the Rideau River, east along the former southern limit of the City of Ottawa, south along Riverside Drive, southeast along Limebank Road, northeast along Leitrim Road, northwest along the Canadian Pacific Railway, northeast along Lester Road, northwest along Conroy Road, northeast along Hunt Club Road to Hawthorne Road and then in a straight line to Blake Road, and northeast along Blake Road, east along Highway 417, and southeast along Boundary Road to the eastern city limit.

History[edit]

The riding was created in 1976 from parts of Grenville—Carleton and Ottawa—Carleton. In 1987, it was abolished when it was redistributed between Nepean, Carleton—Gloucester and Lanark—Carleton ridings.

In 1996, it was re-created from parts of Nepean, Carleton—Gloucester, Lanark—Carleton and Ottawa South ridings.

It consisted initially of the townships of Goulbourn, Osgoode and Rideau, and the City of Nepean, excluding the northeastern part lying north and east of a line drawn from the western city limit east along the Queensway (Highway 417), southwest along Richmond Road, east along the Canadian National Railway, north along Merivale Road, and east along the northern boundary of the National Capital Commission buffer zone to the eastern city limit.

It was given its current boundaries described above in 2003.

The riding has been represented by Conservative Pierre Poilievre since 2004.

Following the 2012 federal electoral boundaries redistribution, the riding will be redistributed mostly into the ridings of Carleton and Nepean with small parts going to Orléans and Kanata—Carleton.

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following members of the House of Commons:

Parliament Years Member Party
Nepean—Carleton
Riding created from Grenville—Carleton and Ottawa—Carleton
31st  1979 − 1980     Walter Baker Progressive Conservative
32nd  1980 − 1984
33rd  1984 − 1988     William Tupper Progressive Conservative
Riding dissolved
Riding re-created from Nepean, Carleton—Gloucester,
Lanark—Carleton and Ottawa South
36th  1997 − 2000     David Pratt Liberal
37th  2000 − 2004
38th  2004 − 2006     Pierre Poilievre Conservative
39th  2006 − 2008
40th  2008 − 2011
41st  2011 − Present

Election results[edit]

1997 – present[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Pierre Poilievre 43,477 54.45 -1.39
Liberal Ryan Keon 20,146 25.23 +1.81
New Democratic Ric Dagenais 12,962 16.23 +6.52
Green Jean-Luc Cooke 3,260 4.08 -6.94
Total valid votes/Expense limit 79,845 100.00  
Total rejected ballots 272 0.34 -0.05
Turnout 80,117 72.55 +3.16
Eligible voters 110,425
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Pierre Poilievre 39,915 55.84 +1.1 $86,150
Liberal Ed Mahfouz 16,743 23.42 -4.6 $40,049
Green Lori Gadzala 7,880 11.02 +5.3 $21,886
New Democratic Phil Brown 6,946 9.71 -1.9 $16,371
Total valid votes/Expense limit 71,484 100.00   $99,843
Total rejected ballots 280 0.39
Total votes 71,764 69.39
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Conservative Pierre Poilievre 39,260 54.7 +9.0
Liberal Michael Gaffney 20,111 28.0 -12.1
New Democratic Laurel Gibbons 8,324 11.6 +2.5
Green Lori Gadzala 4,090 5.7 +1.4
Total valid votes 71,785 100.0
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Conservative Pierre Poilievre 30,420 45.7 -7.7
Liberal David Pratt 26,684 40.1 -1.1
New Democratic Phil Brown 6,072 9.1 +5.4
Green Chris Walker 2,886 4.3 +3.0
Marijuana Brad Powers 561 0.8
Total valid votes 66,623 100.0

Note: Conservative vote is compared to the total of the Canadian Alliance vote and Progressive Conservative vote in 2000 election.

Canadian federal election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal David Pratt 24,570 41.2 -7.6
Alliance Michael Green 22,310 37.4 +11.0
Progressive Conservative Bill Knott 9,536 16.0 -3.1
New Democratic Craig Parsons 2,223 3.7 -1.1
Green Isobel McGregor 805 1.3
Canadian Action Jack Waisvisz 131 0.2 -0.3
Natural Law Lester Newby 118 0.2 -0.2
Total valid votes 59,693 100.0

Note: Canadian Alliance vote is compared to the Reform vote in 1997 election.

Canadian federal election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal David Pratt 28,366 48.8
Reform Paul Fitzgerald 15,333 26.4
Progressive Conservative Betty Hill 11,072 19.0
New Democratic Cathy Martin 2,788 4.8
Canadian Action Terrence Bell 331 0.6
Natural Law Brian Jackson 238 0.4
Total valid votes 58,128 100.0

1979 – 1988[edit]

Canadian federal election, 1984
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Bill Tupper 41,663 55.9 +2.4
Liberal Gord Hunter 20,852 28.0 -5.1
New Democratic Bea Murray 11,035 14.8 +2.6
Green Gregory Vezina 737 1.0
Independent Ray Turmel 204 0.3
Total valid votes 74,491 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1980
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Walter Baker 31,498 53.5 -6.0
Liberal Gord Hunter 19,482 33.1 +5.4
New Democratic Alan White 7,187 12.2 -0.5
Rhinoceros Alan Cockerell 658 1.1
Total valid votes 58,825 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1979
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive Conservative Walter Baker 36,717 59.6
Liberal Bluma Appel 17,108 27.8
New Democratic Marnie Girvan 7,810 12.7
Total valid votes 61,635 100.0

References[edit]

Notes[edit]