Nu skool breaks

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Nu skool breaks (or Nu breaks as it is sometimes referred) is a sub-genre of breakbeat originating during the period between 1998 and 2002.[1] The style is usually characterized by more abstract, more technical sounds, sometimes incorporated from other genres of electronic dance music, including UK garage, electro, and drum and bass. Typically, tracks ranged between 125 to 140 bpm, often featuring a dominant bass line. In contrast with big beat, another sub-genre of breakbeat, the sound set consisted less of hip hop samples and acid-type sounds,[2] instead emphasizing dance-friendliness[3] and "new" sound produced by modern production techniques using synthesizers, effect processors, and computers.[1]

Origins[edit]

The term "Nu Skool Breaks" is widely attributed to Rennie Pilgrem and Adam Freeland, who used it to describe the sound at their night Friction, which was launched at Bar Rumba in 1996, with promoter Ian Williams.[3][4]

The tracks Renegades by Uptown Connection, and Double Impact by Boundarie Hunters are considered to be the earliest produced to formally adopt the genre.[citation needed]

In 1998, the term "Nu Skool Breaks" was used on two compilations, Nu Skool Breakz, Volume 1 and 2, compiled with Danny McMillan and released through UK-based Kickin Records. The first volume of these was recorded live at the aforementioned London club night Friction.[3]

Labels that featured early Nu Skool Breaks releases included Botchit & Scarper, Fuel Records (UK), Hard Hands, Marine Parade Records, TCR, and Ultimatum Breaks.

Artists[edit]

Artists recognized for producing Nu Skool Breaks include: Aquasky, Beber, Bargecharge, B.L.I.M., Buckfunk 3000, Dark Globe, Freq Nasty, Full Moon Scientist, Hybrid, Ils, Danny McMillan, Plump DJs, R-Kidz, Silicon Valley Def Stars, Solid Ground, Stanton Warriors, Subphonic, Tipper, Tsunami One, Uptown Connection, and Waveform.

Industry awards[edit]

The breaks genre is well served by the Breakspoll International Breakbeat Awards, held annually in London for many years. Notable winners of awards include Krafty Kuts, Dub Pistols, Deekline, Freestylers and Elite Force.

Radio and Forums[edit]

There are a few forums and online radio stations dedicated to this genre, the most prominent being nsbradio.co.uk and nuskoolbreaks.co.uk but others include NuBreaks, Ghettofunk.co.uk and Rough Tempo. Occasionally BBC Radio1 will feature the genre.

External links[edit]

  • [1] the international breakbeat awards
  • [2] NSB radio
  • [3] Nuskoolbreaks.co.uk Forum and industry promotion
  • [4] Nubreaks.com online radio and community

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fonooni, Damon (2002). "Embracing BT". Lunar Magazine. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 
  2. ^ Griffiths, Alex (1998). BeatsElectronicaUK (booklet). Music Collection International, Ltd. p. 1. 50073. 
  3. ^ a b c McMillan, Danny (1998). Nu Skool Breakz (CD insert) (Media notes) (in English). Various. US: Instinct Records. EX390-2. 
  4. ^ "Breaks Pilgrem-age". Resident Advisor. 24 April 2002.