Oded Brigade

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Oded Brigade
חטיבת עודד
OdedBrigade.svg
Brigade insignia
Active 1948-?
Country  Israel
Allegiance Israel Defense Forces
Branch Infantry
Size Brigade
Engagements

1948 Arab–Israeli War

Suez Crisis

The Oded Brigade (Hebrew: חטיבת עודד‎, also known as the 9th Brigade in the 1948 Arab-Israeli war) was an Israeli infantry brigade, one of ten brigades fielded by the Haganah (the precursor of the Israeli Defense Forces).[1] It was headquartered in Jerusalem. It was a "a ragtag organization composed mainly of home guardsmen and other defense groups."[2] The poorly supplied brigade was defending Al-Malkiyya in June 1948, replacing the Yiftach Brigade, when the Lebanese army attacked. The Oded Brigade had to withdraw after 10 hours of fighting.[2]

In July 1948, the brigade moved to capture the Arab villages Malha and Ein Karim, with the support of LEHI and Irgun, aiming to link up with the Harel Brigade and capture the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Railway. There was limited fighting.[3]

The brigade had attached to it a "Unit of the Minorities" made up of Druze, and smaller numbers of Bedouins and Circassians, who had defected from the Arab Liberation Army. The unit saw action with the brigade in Operation Hiram during October 1948. This was a propaganda coup and helped strengthen Jewish-Druze relations.[4] Ben Dunkelman says that the brigade had a mainly diversionary role in Operation Hiram.[5] The brigade also took part in Operation Yoav in October 1948, which opened the road to the Negev.[6]

Involved in the Sinai Campaign against Egypt, the brigade held a victory assembly at Sharm el-Sheikh on 6 November 1956.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tal, David (2004). War in Palestine, 1948: strategy and diplomacy. Cass series--Israeli history, politics, and society 26. Routledge. p. 392. ISBN 0-7146-5275-X. 
  2. ^ a b Hughes, Matthew (Winter 2005). "Lebanon's Armed Forces and the Arab-Israeli War, 1948–49". Journal of Palestine Studies (University of California Press) 34 (2): 24–41. doi:10.1525/jps.2005.34.2.024. 
  3. ^ Bell, J. Bowyer (1996). Terror out of Zion: the fight for Israeli independence. Transaction Publishers. p. 331. ISBN 1-56000-870-9. 
  4. ^ Rogan, Eugene L.; Shlaim, Avi (2001). The war for Palestine: rewriting the history of 1948 By Eugene L. Rogan, Avi Shlaim. Cambridge Middle East studies 15. Cambridge University Press. p. 63. ISBN 0-521-79476-5. 
  5. ^ Dunkelman, Ben (1984). Dual Allegiance: An Autobiography. Formac Publishing Company. p. 328. ISBN 0-88780-127-7. 
  6. ^ "Operation “Yoav” (October 15-22, 1948)". Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved 31 July 2010. 
  7. ^ Morris, Benny (1997). Israel's border wars, 1949-1956: Arab infiltration, Israeli retaliation, and the countdown to the Suez War (2 ed.). Oxford University Press. p. 444. ISBN 0-19-829262-7.