Ossining (Metro-North station)

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Ossining
Ossining, NY, train station.jpg
View southbound along tracks to Sing Sing, 2007
Station statistics
Address 1 Main Street and Westerly Road
Ossining, NY, 10562
Coordinates 41°09′22″N 73°52′11″W / 41.1560°N 73.8696°W / 41.1560; -73.8696Coordinates: 41°09′22″N 73°52′11″W / 41.1560°N 73.8696°W / 41.1560; -73.8696
Line(s)
Connections Local Transit Bee-Line Bus System: 11, 13, 14, 19
BSicon BOOT.svg NY Waterway: Haverstraw–Ossining Ferry
Platforms 2 island platforms
Tracks 4
Other information
Electrified 700V (DC) third rail
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Fare zone 5
Formerly Sing-Sing
Services
Preceding station   MTA NYC logo.svg Metro-North Railroad   Following station
Hudson Line
toward Poughkeepsie
  Former services  
New York Central Railroad
toward Chicago
Water Level Route
toward Peekskill
Hudson Division

The Ossining Metro-North Railroad station serves residents of Ossining, New York via the Hudson Line and is one of four express stations on that line south of Croton–Harmon seeing most trains minus peak hour trains to/from Poughkeepsie. Trains leave for New York City every 25 to 35 minutes on weekdays. It is 30.1 miles (48.4 km) from Grand Central Terminal and travel time to Grand Central is about 48 minutes.

Near the station is a ferry dock which is used by the NY Waterway-operated ferry connection to Haverstraw, allowing Rockland County, New York commuters to use the Hudson Line as an alternative to the New Jersey Transit-operated lines across the Hudson River.

Just south of the station is a section of track which runs through the middle of Sing Sing Correctional Facility.

History[edit]

The Hudson River Railroad reached Ossining in 1848, opening the village up to industrial development along the waterfront and allowing farmers inland to ship their produce to the markets of New York City. Among the riverside industrial concerns benefiting from the railroad were the marble quarries at Sing Sing Prison, Benjamin Brandreth's pill factory (still extant a short distance up the river) and others. These businesses gradually supplanted the boat builders and docks that had occupied the riverfront in the early 19th century.

Originally the station building was at grade level. In 1914 the New York Central Railroad, which the Hudson River had long been merged into, built a new station, the current building, in the Renaissance Revival style. It was placed on metal stilts to allow Main Street to pass over the tracks, eliminating the grade crossing that had been part of the original station.[1] Like the rest of the Hudson Line, the station became a Penn Central station once the NYC & Pennsylvania Railroads merged in 1968. Penn Central's continuous financial despair throughout the 1970s forced them to turn over their commuter service to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The station and the railroad were turned over to Conrail in 1976, and eventually became part of the MTA's Metro-North Railroad in 1983. In 2000, New York Waterways used the station as the eastern port for the Haverstraw–Ossining Pedestrian Ferry creating a link between the station and Central Rockland County.

Platforms and tracks[edit]

4 Hudson Line for Grand Central
2 Hudson Line for Grand Central
Empire Service no stop
1 Hudson Line for Poughkeepsie
Empire Service no stop
3 Hudson Line for Poughkeepsie

The station has two high-level island platforms each 10 cars long. The west platform next to Tracks 2 and 4 is generally used by southbound trains. The east platform next to Tracks 1 and 3 is generally used by northbound trains.

The Hudson Line has four tracks here. Only one of the inner express tracks is powered.[clarification needed]

Media[edit]

Ossining Station was visible in the background of certain commercials for Kaopectate used in 2009.

In the series premiere of AMC's Mad Men ("Smoke Gets in Your Eyes"), set in March 1960, Don Draper is seen disembarking the New York Central train at Ossining; this is the first indication that he lives in the area.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Village of Ossining, Village of Ossining Significant Sites and Structures Guide PDF, April 2010, pp. 252–54, retrieved June 26, 2011.

External links[edit]

Media related to Ossining (Metro-North station) at Wikimedia Commons