Paul Rayner

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Paul Rayner (born 1959) is an English-New Zealand ceramicist known for his work creating pop culture figures in the tradition of Toby jugs and Staffordshire figurines.[1]

Born in Luton, England, Rayner moved to New Zealand as a teenager. After working at the Sarjeant Gallery in Whanganui, he developed an interest in art.[2] Rayner did a Bachelor of Fine Arts focused on painting at the University of Auckland before working in New Zealand museums and art galleries while developing his ceramics.[3]

After leaving the Sarjeant Gallery in 2006,[4] Paul has run a gallery and often collaborates with, his brother Mark Rayner.[5][6]

Works[edit]

Exhibitions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "TBI Q&A: Ceramicist Paul Rayner | The Big Idea | Te Aria Nui". thebigidea.co.nz. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  2. ^ "Arts Dialogue : Bahá´í Association for the Arts". bahai-library.com. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  3. ^ "Seed Gallery - Paul Rayner biography". seedgallery.co.nz. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  4. ^ "Good outcome still possible for Sarjeant, says Milbank - Wanganui Chronicle - Wanganui Chronicle News". nzherald.co.nz. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  5. ^ "index.html". raynerbrothers.com. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  6. ^ "Arty brothers bonded with clay - Wanganui Chronicle - Wanganui Chronicle News". nzherald.co.nz. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  7. ^ "’Ken & Ken (the Topp Twins)’ - Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa". collections.tepapa.govt.nz. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  8. ^ "Caring is our strength; 'The lover of... | Items | National Library of New Zealand". natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  9. ^ "Carmen; Rayner, Paul; 2004; 2004/11/2 - The Dowse Art Museum on NZMuseums". nzmuseums.co.nz. Retrieved 2014-01-25.