Philip Whitchurch

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Philip Whitchurch (born 30 January 1951) is a British stage, film, and television actor. He is best known for playing Chief Inspector Philip Cato in The Bill from 1993 to 1995. He also played another character, Inspector Twist, on the same show, as well as Tyler in My Hero from 2000 to 2006.

His other television work includes Sharpe, The Brothers McGregor,The Detectives, Peak Practice, Holby City, Bergerac, Boon, Casualty, Monarch of the Glen, Midsomer Murders, G.B.H., Van der Valk, The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, Waterfront Beat, Dramarama, Peak Practice, Wire in the Blood, Foyle's War,Mersey Beat, In Exile, Get Real, Plotlands, A Perfect State, Virtual Murder, El C.I.D. and The Vicar of Dibley.

He also played Derek, the chair of governors, in Hope and Glory and appeared in the BBC drama New Tricks.

He has also narrated the popular TV-am children's series The Shoe People (he has also done all the voices for the characters) and supplied the voice of Zippi in CITV's cartoon Toucan Tecs.

Philip played Billy's dad in Elton John's West End stage adaptation of Billy Elliot from 5 December 2005 until 2 December 2006. He returned to the role from 2 June 2008 until 29 November 2008. He also played Billy's dad in Elton John's Broadway stage adaptation of Billy Elliot from 29 January 2010 until 2 May 2010.

In 2008, he starred alongside other former The Bill actors, Cyril Nri and Russell Boulter in an episode of BBC1's Waking the Dead.

In 2012, he starred alongside former Bros member turned actor Luke Goss in the feature film 'Interview with a Hitman' (2012) written and directed by Perry Bhandal in which he played the British crime boss Tosca. Phil also played a character called "The Geordie", a hoodwinked thug, in the ITV Drama "Doors Open" which was shown on Boxing Day 2012.

in 2013, he played the role of Alfred Chalmers in Ian Rankin's debut play Dark Road.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ian Rankin's Dark Road, Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh". independent.co.uk. The Independent. 30 September 2013. Retrieved 25 October 2013. 

External links[edit]