Plaetoria (gens)

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A denarius of the gens depicting Fortuna and Sors, a reference to the family's Praenestine origins[1]
Denarius of L. Plaetorius Cestianus commemorating the assassination of Caesar, with the head of Brutus and a "freedom cap" between two daggers marked "Ides of March"

Plaetorius was the family name (nomen) of a plebeian gens in ancient Rome.

Roman Republic[edit]

Plaetorii are noted as holding office during the Republic from the 2nd century BC through the civil wars of the 40s BC.[2] Several members of the gens issued denarii from the late 70s into the 40s,[3] one of them punning on the cognomen Cestianus by depicting an athlete holding a cestus.[4] The Cestiani branch seems to come from a Praenestine family of Cestii by adoption into the Plaetorii of Tusculum.[5] Their coinage representing Sors recognizes Praeneste as the Italic oracle most renowned for the casting of lots.[6] A Plaetorius is among the supporters of Pompeius in the civil wars of the 40s, and the best-known coinage from a member of the gens is a denarius issued for Brutus commemorating the assassination of Caesar on the Ides of March.

References[edit]

  1. ^ P.G.P. MeyboomThe Nile Mosaic of Palestrina: Early Evidence of Egyptian Religion in Italy (Brill, 1995), p. 161.
  2. ^ Unless otherwise noted, information on careers and citations of primary sources from T.R.S. Broughton, The Magistrates of the Roman Republic (American Philological Association, 1951, 1952, 1986), vols. 1–3.
  3. ^ Michael H. Crawford, Roman Republican Coinage (Cambridge University Press, 1974), pp. 83, 86–87, 408, 415, 418.
  4. ^ Eugene S. McCartney, "Casting Puns on Ancient Monuments," American Journal of Archaeology 23 (1919), p. 62.
  5. ^ Crawford, Roman Republican Coinage, p. 418, citing T.P. Wiseman, New Men of the Roman Senate, 251.
  6. ^ Crawford, Roman Republican Coinage, p. 418.
  7. ^ Censorinus, De die natali 24.3; Plautus, Epidicus 25–27; Varro, De lingua latina 6.5; Aulus Gellius 3.2.4; Broughton, MRR2, p. 472.
  8. ^ Discussed by Broughton, MRR2, p. 472.
  9. ^ Plaetoria, Broughton contra RE, Supb. 7.398, which has Laetoria.
  10. ^ Cicero, De officiis 3.61 and De natura deorum 3.74; also the Lex Iulia Municipalis, line 112.
  11. ^ Plautus, Pseudolus 303f. and Rudens 1380–1382.
  12. ^ Broughton, MRR2, p. 472.
  13. ^ Livy 42.26.6–7; Broughton, MRR1, p. 414. The other two ambassadors were Aulus Terentius Varro and Gaius Cicereius.
  14. ^ Senatus consultum de Agro Pergameno, with Plattorius amended to Plaetorius; Broughton, MRR2, p. 494.
  15. ^ Valerius Maximus 9.2.1, see also Florus 2.9.26 (without praenomen) and Orosius 5.21.8 as P. Laetorius; Broughton, MRR2, p. 494, and MRR3, p. 157.
  16. ^ Cicero, Pro Cluentio 165.
  17. ^ Broughton, MRR2, p. 102, and MRR3, p. 157.
  18. ^ See also Ronald Syme, reviewing Broughton's MRR in Classical Philology 50.2 (1955), pp. 129–130, 132.
  19. ^ Cicero, Pro Fronteio 1.
  20. ^ On this point see also Ronald Syme, “The Sons of Crassus.” Latomus 39 (1980) 403–408.
  21. ^ Cicero, Pro Cluentio 126.
  22. ^ Cicero, Pro Cluentio 147, see also 126.
  23. ^ Broughton, MRR2, pp. 161–162, conjectures this date for a praetorship based on assigning his service as a iudex to 66 and on the gap that leaves room for his name on the Fasti of Macedonia.
  24. ^ SEG I.165 Delphi.
  25. ^ Cicero, Ad familiares 1.8.1, where the M. Plaetorius referred to is not identified as Cestianus.
  26. ^ Broughton, MRR2, pp. 128, 143, 150 (note 3, where he explains his reasoning for assigning years for Plaetorius's offices), 161–162, 169, 219; MRR3, p. 157.
  27. ^ Bellum Alexandrinum 34.5; Broughton, MRR2, p. 274.
  28. ^ Bellum Africum 96; Broughton, MRR2, p. 494.
  29. ^ Broughton, MRR2, p. 360. Epigraphic evidence as L. Plaet(orius) Cest(ianus).