Puerto Viejo de Talamanca

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This article is about the coastal town of Puerto Viejo in southeast Costa Rica. For the town in northeast Costa Rica, see Puerto Viejo de Sarapiquí.
Puerto Viejo
Old Harbor
Town
Puerto Viejo de Talamanca
Puerto Viejo de Talamanca.jpg
Nickname(s): Walaba
Motto: Wh'appin?
Puerto Viejo is located in Costa Rica
Puerto Viejo
Puerto Viejo
Coordinates: 9°39′30″N 82°45′10″W / 9.65833°N 82.75278°W / 9.65833; -82.75278Coordinates: 9°39′30″N 82°45′10″W / 9.65833°N 82.75278°W / 9.65833; -82.75278
Country Costa Rica
Province Limón
Canton Talamanca
Government
 • Type Democratic Republica
Time zone Central Standard Time (UTC-6)

Puerto Viejo de Talamanca is a coastal town in Talamanca in Limón Province in southeastern Costa Rica, known simply as Puerto Viejo to locals.[1] The town was originally called Old Harbor until the Spanish central Costa Rican government institutionalized Spanish as the new local language and changed the names of the towns and landmarks in the area from English to Spanish. Fields became Bri Bri. Bluff became Cahuita. The Afro-Caribbean English speaking culture was actively dismantled. There is another town commonly known as Puerto Viejo in northeastern Costa Rica, which can confuse visitors. Buses leaving the same San José station for either of the Puerto Viejos display the same destination, "Puerto Viejo".[1]

Puerto Viejo de Talamanca is a popular tourist destination. It is known in the surfing community for the biggest and most powerful wave in Costa Rica, known as Salsa Brava. It is also home to beautiful beaches, such as Playa Chiquita, Playa Negra, and Punta Uva, which are a few of Costa Rica's most spectacular beaches which can be found between Puerto Viejo and Manzanillo. Manzanillo is a popular location for kayaking and is 13 km (8 mi) south along the beach. The popular Jaguar Rescue Centre is nearby.

Many tourists stop in Puerto Viejo en route to the Panamanian border at Sixaola. This border crossing is popular with people going to and from Bocas del Toro.[2] Puerto Viejo offers the closest accommodations, restaurants, and services to the border. The small border towns of Sixaola and Guabito, Panama are 49 km (30 mi) south of Puerto Viejo.[1] The border towns have no accommodations or restaurants.[2] Tourists must stop at Costa Rican and Panamanian customs.[1] Changuinola, Panama offers accommodations, restaurants, and services about 10 km (6 mi) away from the border.[2] The townspeople are made up of Ticos and Ticas (native Costa Ricans), a substantial Jamaican population, as well as a number of Europeans who have emigrated to the area.

The outskirts of town and the mountains are home to the Bribri Indians. The howler monkey is native to the region.

Pictures[edit]

Playa Negra in Puerto Viejo de Talamanca
Playa Negra in Puerto Viejo de Talamanca 
Parts of the reef are visible just off the beach in Puerto Viejo
Parts of the reef are visible just off the beach 

Planned Demolitions (2012)[edit]

In early April, 2012, nine local businesses and residents were formally notified of the impending evictions and subsequent demolitions of their properties, for being in violation of Costa Rica's Maritime Law.[3]

Seventy-six properties (business and residential) have been cited as "in violation" of the Maritime Zoning Laws, with the first phase of demolitions planned for November, 2012. It is unknown why the Costa Rican government decided to act so urgently and decisively, but local residents are long familiar with proposals for "Mega Marinas" and other redevelopment plans for the region.[4] There is a complex history of laws and findings that are being actively reviewed and debated by the affected communities. The Vice President made a show of support for villagers in Manzanillo whose homes were scheduled to be demolished. As of 19 April 2012, the planned demolitions have apparently been stayed for the moment.

In March 2014 the Costa Rican legislature approved a law which permitted those residents whose homes were due to be demolished to remain where they were.

Climate[edit]

Puerto Viejo has a tropical climate. Temperatures remain consistent during the year. Sunrise and sunset change very little during the year (about 6:00 AM and 6:00 PM, respectively). Limón International Airport is 55 km to the north, and has similar average temperatures and precipitation.

Climate data for Limon International Airport, Costa Rica
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 80
(27)
80
(27)
82
(28)
83
(28)
83
(28)
83
(28)
82
(28)
82
(28)
84
(29)
83
(28)
81
(27)
80
(27)
81.9
(27.7)
Average low °F (°C) 71
(22)
71
(22)
72
(22)
73
(23)
75
(24)
75
(24)
74
(23)
74
(23)
75
(24)
75
(24)
73
(23)
72
(22)
73.3
(22.9)
Precipitation inches (mm) 12.56
(319)
7.90
(200.7)
7.61
(193.3)
11.30
(287)
11.08
(281.4)
10.87
(276.1)
16.06
(407.9)
11.37
(288.8)
6.42
(163.1)
7.80
(198.1)
14.45
(367)
15.81
(401.6)
133.23
(3,384)
Source: Weather Underground [5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Costa Rica 2008, New York: Fodor's Travel, 2008, ISBN 978-1-4000-1803-1 
  2. ^ a b c Moon Panama (2nd ed.), Berkley, CA: Avalon Travel, Nov 2008, ISBN 978-1-59880-085-2 
  3. ^ Editor, Editor. "Demolition Orders Issued for Nine Buildings Deemed in Violation of Maritime Zone". Puerto Viejo Satellite. Retrieved 1 April 2012. 
  4. ^ Raub, Erin. "Locals Concerned About Marina in Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica". Costa Rica Pages. Retrieved 18 April 2008. 
  5. ^ "Weather for Limon International Airport". Weather Underground.