Raging Bull (roller coaster)

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Raging Bull
Raging Bull (Six Flags Great America) 01.JPG
Riders scream through Raging Bull's second turn.
Six Flags Great America
Park section Southwest Territory
Coordinates 42°21′56.89″N 87°56′13.39″W / 42.3658028°N 87.9370528°W / 42.3658028; -87.9370528Coordinates: 42°21′56.89″N 87°56′13.39″W / 42.3658028°N 87.9370528°W / 42.3658028; -87.9370528
Status Operating
Opening date May 1, 1999
General statistics
Type Steel
Manufacturer Bolliger & Mabillard
Designer Werner Stengel
Model Hyper Coaster
Lift/launch system Chain Lift
Height 202 ft (62 m)
Drop 208 ft (63 m)
Length 5,057 ft (1,541 m)
Speed 73 mph (117 km/h)
Duration 2:40
Max vertical angle 65°
Capacity 1200 riders per hour
G-force 4
Restraint Style "Clamshell" individual ratcheting lap bar
Height restriction 54 in (137 cm)
Trains 3 trains with 9 cars. Riders are arranged 4 across in a single row for a total of 36 riders per train.
Flash Pass Available
Raging Bull at RCDB
Pictures of Raging Bull at RCDB

Raging Bull is a Bolliger & Mabillard hyper-twister steel roller coaster at Six Flags Great America. It was built in 1999, and features a 208-foot (63 m) first drop and top speed of 73 miles per hour (117 km/h), and is currently one of the most popular rides at Six Flags Great America.[citation needed] At 5,057 feet (1,541 m) in length, it is the longest roller coaster at the park. Raging Bull is the world's second "hyper-twister" roller coaster, after Fujiyama at Fuji-Q Highland, built by TOGO, a roller coaster company based in Japan. It is also B&M's 2nd hypercoaster, after Apollo's Chariot at Busch Gardens Williamsburg.

The ride received a fresh coat of paint for the 2008 season.

Location[edit]

Raging Bull sits next to Viper, one of four wooden roller coasters in the park. The land used by Raging Bull was formerly occupied by Rolling Thunder, a bobsled which had been relocated from Six Flags Great Adventure in 1990 and was removed in 1996 to make room for Southwest Territory, which Raging Bull is a flagship attraction of, alongside Viper. The bobsled Rolling Thunder is now Alpine Bobsled at The Great Escape & Splashwater Kingdom in Queensbury, New York.

Theme[edit]

Raging Bull is named after a fictitious ferocious beast that terrorized the citizens of the old Southwest Territory until they fled the town and built the courtyard and mission seen today.[citation needed]

Ride Layout[edit]

The ride starts with a left turn and a small dip out of the station as riders enter the lift hill. At the 202-foot peak (62 m), the ride drops a very small distance (known as a pre-drop) followed by a 208-foot plunge (63 m) into a tunnel at the base of the drop reaching speeds of up to 73 mph (117 km/h). The train then ascends 155 feet (47 m) into a hammerhead turn to the right, passing over the queue line of the neighboring Viper wooden roller coaster twice. After the turnaround, the train climbs a 141-foot-parabolic hill (43 m) that applies a trim brake near the hill's apex. It then enters a 128-foot hill (39 m) that banks left over the station area, followed by a dip under the lift hill and a hammerhead turn to the left. Riders then twist up into a mid-course brake run. Upon clearing the block brakes, the train drops into a valley where the on-ride camera snaps photos. Riders then experience a slight hill and a rising helix as the grand finale – a series of low-to-the-ground turns that culminate with a twisting ascension into the station brake run.

Awards[edit]

Golden Ticket Awards: Top steel Roller Coasters
Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Ranking 12[1] 11[2] 14 (tie)[3] 17[4] 14[5] 9[6] 11[7] 12[8] 11[9] 14[10] 16[11] 24[12] 19[13] 31[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. August 2000. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. August 2001. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Top 25 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. September 2002. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 14–15B. September 2003. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 18–19B. September 2004. Archived from the original on April 3, 2007. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2005. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2006. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 11 (6.2): 36–37. September 2007. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 12 (6.2): 36–37. September 2008. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 13 (6.2): 32–33. September 2009. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 14 (6.2): 34–35. September 2010. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 15 (6.2): 38–39. September 2011. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Top 50 steel roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 16 (6.2): 36–37. September 2012. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 
  14. ^ "2013 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 17 (6.2): 34–35. September 2013. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 5, 2013. 

External links[edit]