Robert C. Green

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Robert C. Green
Born (1954-10-21) October 21, 1954 (age 60)
Richmond, Virginia
Institutions Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Alma mater Amherst College
University of Virginia School of Medicine
Emory University

Robert C. Green is a physician and researcher at the Division of Genetics and Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School whose research focuses on the integration of personal genomics into clinical practice. His research includes the return of clinically relevant genetic results and incidental findings, particularly in the era of whole genome sequencing.[1][2][3]

Green has played a key role in the field of translational genomics and the integration of personal genomics into clinical practice, including planning and directing the first large-scale randomized clinical trials in translational genetics.[4][5][6] Green also led the American College of Medical Genetics Working Group that developed recommendations for the return of incidental findings in clinical genome and exome sequencing.[7]

Additionally, Green's research has led to key contributions in understanding genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease, including the development of risk estimates based on family history and genetic markers.[8][9] He leads the ongoing REVEAL study, which has studied patients’ responses to being informed of their genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease.[10]

Green graduated from Amherst College and the University of Virginia School of Medicine before completing a residency in neurology at Harvard Medical School’s Longwood Neurology Program and completing research fellowships at Beth Israel Hospital and Children’s Hospital in Boston. Before his current post, Green was on the faculty of the Emory University School of Medicine (1988-1996) and the Boston University School of Medicine (1999-2011).[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Green, R.C., et al. "Disclosure of APOE genotype for risk of Alzheimer’s disease." New England Journal of Medicine, 361: 245-254, 2009.
  2. ^ Cupples, L.A., et al. "Estimating risk curves for first-degree relatives of patients with Alzheimer’s disease: The REVEAL study", Journal of the American Medical Association, 6: 192-196, 2004.
  3. ^ Green, R.C., et al. "Effect of Tarenflurbil on cognitive decline and activities of daily living in patients with mild Alzheimer's Disease." Journal of the American Medical Association, 302: 2557-2565, 2009.
  4. ^ Green, R.C., et al. "Disclosure of APOE genotype for risk of Alzheimer’s disease." New England Journal of Medicine, 361: 245-254, 2009.
  5. ^ Vassy, J.L., et al. "The MedSeq Project: a randomized trial of integrating whole genome sequencing into clinical medicine." Trials, 15:85, 2014.
  6. ^ Green, R.C., et al. "Using genomic sequence information in clinical medicine." Genomic and Personalized Medicine (2nd Edition), G. Ginsburg, et al., Editors. 2012.
  7. ^ Green, R.C., et al. "ACMG recommendations for reporting of incidental findings in clinical exome and genome sequencing." Genetics in Medicine, 15(7): 565-574, 2013.
  8. ^ Green, R.C., et al. "Risk of dementia among white and African American relatives of Alzheimer’s disease patients." Journal of the American Medical Association, 287: 329-336, 2002.
  9. ^ Cupples, L.A., et al. "Estimating risk curves for first-degree relatives of patients with Alzheimer’s disease: The REVEAL study", Journal of the American Medical Association, 6: 192-196, 2004.
  10. ^ Grady, Denise. "Learning of Risk of Alzheimer's Seems to Do No Harm". The New York Times. July 16, 2009.
  11. ^ "Robert C. Green", Genetic Alliance.