Bob Hardy (bassist)

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Bob Hardy
Bob hardy.jpg
Bob Hardy at Latitude Festival
Background information
Birth name Robert Byron Hardy
Born (1980-08-16) 16 August 1980 (age 34)
Dewsbury, West Yorkshire, England
Genres Indie rock, indie pop, art rock
Instruments Bass guitar, maraca
Years active Early 2000s–present
Labels Domino
Associated acts Franz Ferdinand
Website www.franzferdinand.co.uk
Notable instruments
Rickenbacker 4001
Hagström
Fender Precision Bass
Rickenbacker 3000

Robert Byron "Bob" Hardy (born 16 August 1980) is the bassist for the Glasgow-based band, Franz Ferdinand.

Biography[edit]

Hardy was an artist interested in music while Kapranos was a musician interested in art; this helped the two become firm friends. Through Hardy's friends from the Art School, Kapranos developed an interest in the work of the Dadaists and the Russian Constructivists. After Hardy had met Nick McCarthy, whose girlfriend was also at the art school, the two began to date members of Hardy's year. Many of the earlier shows of the band would come about thanks to the band's art world contacts.[1][2]

Kapranos had been given a bass guitar by his friend Mick Cooke, a member of the cult Glaswegian popsters, Belle & Sebastian on the condition that he "did something useful with it". Some time around the end of 2001, Hardy was sitting in Kapranos' kitchen in Glasgow. Kapranos had just been given the bass. So he asked "Do you want to learn to play the bass then, Bob?", to which Hardy replied, "No, I'm an artist, not a musician." Alex responded, saying, "It's the same thing," which led to Hardy eventually giving in.[3]

Equipment[edit]

Hardy plays 1974 and 1978 Rickenbacker 4001s / Hagström / Fender Precision. He used to use an SWR Goliath bass cabinet but now uses an Ampeg SVT Pro head and Ampeg 8x10 cabs, and uses Ernie Ball strings - roundwounds, medium gauge. His plectrum is a custom .60 mm nylon/teflon amalgam.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ An A-Z of Franz Ferdinand (2007, Helen Chase)
  2. ^ Pages 80-81 from "Franz Ferdinand and the Pop Renaissance" - ISBN 1-905287-00-3
  3. ^ [1][dead link]

External links[edit]