Robert T. Brown Nature Sanctuary

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Robert T. Brown Nature Sanctuary
RTB landscape.jpg
Robert T. Brown Nature Sanctuary in springtime
Map showing the location of Robert T. Brown Nature Sanctuary
Map showing the location of Robert T. Brown Nature Sanctuary
Location within the state of Michigan
Location Upper Peninsula, Houghton County, Michigan USA
Nearest city Painesdale, Michigan
Coordinates 47°01′32″N 88°44′18″W / 47.02549°N 88.73825°W / 47.02549; -88.73825Coordinates: 47°01′32″N 88°44′18″W / 47.02549°N 88.73825°W / 47.02549; -88.73825
Area 19 acres (7.7 ha)
Established 2002
Governing body Michigan Nature Assoc. (non-profit)

Robert T. Brown Nature Sanctuary is a 19-acre (7.7 ha) sanctuary located in Houghton County, Michigan. It is maintained and preserved by the Michigan Nature Association, which is a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting Michigan's exceptional natural habitats and extraordinary plants and animals.

History[edit]

The late Dr. Robert Thorson Brown (1923–2002), for whom the sanctuary is named, was Professor of Biological Sciences at Michigan Technological University until his retirement in 1983. He loved plants and the natural world that supports them. He was an expert in the identification of plants, mushrooms and lichens, which his research involved. He enjoyed teaching the complex interactions between organisms and often took his students on many field trips. Shortly before he died, Dr. Brown assisted in the selection of the site which is now the Robert T. Brown Nature Sanctuary.

About the Sanctuary[edit]

The Brown Sanctuary is a northern wetland surrounded by a small pond and bordered by a black spruce, tamarack, and white cedar swamp. Several shrubs can be found in the sanctuary, including leather leaf, bog-rosemary, Labrador tea, and both small and large cranberry. Several species of orchids are also found here.

Many carnivorous plants can be found in this fen, such as pitcher plant, round leaved sundew, and hidden fruited bladderwort. These unique plants capture and digest insects and other food to obtain the necessary nutrients.

References[edit]

http://www.michigannature.org