Robert Woodhead

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Robert J. Woodhead is an entrepreneur, software engineer and former game programmer. He claims that a common thread in his career is "doing weird things with computers". Along with Andrew C. Greenberg, he created the Apple II game Wizardry: Proving Grounds of the Mad Overlord, one of the first role-playing video games written for a personal computer, as well as several of its sequels.[1][2][3]

Later, he authored Interferon and Virex,[4] two of the earliest anti-virus applications for the Macintosh, and co-founded AnimEigo, one of the first US anime releasing companies. As a result of this venture, while living in Japan, he married his translator and interpreter, Natsumi Ueki, together with whom he has two children.[5] He also runs a search engine promotion website called SelfPromotion.com.

As a hobby, he builds combat robots, and his children, James Ueki and Alex Ueki, are the 2004 and 2005 Robot Fighting League National Champions in the 30 lb Featherweight class.

Woodhead made a cameo appearance in the 1982 video game Ultima II as an NPC; when the player talked to him he would scream "Copy Protect!", a sarcastic reference to the extensive copy protection methods used in video games of the time. He also has a screen credit in the film Real Genius as their "Hacking Consultant".

References[edit]

  1. ^ DeMaria, Rusel; Wilson, Johnny L. (2003-12-18). High score!: the illustrated history of electronic games. McGraw-Hill Professional. pp. 154–155. ISBN 978-0-07-223172-4. Retrieved 8 March 2011. 
  2. ^ Buckler, Grant (9 March 1985). "Small firms find big-time markets". Montral Gazette. Retrieved 8 March 2011. 
  3. ^ "Small U.S. game maker caters to global audience". Eugene Register-Guard. 24 September 1995. Retrieved 8 March 2011. 
  4. ^ Kates, William (13 February 1989). "MacIntosh computers' virus cured". The Evening News. Retrieved 8 March 2011. 
  5. ^ Robert Woodhead at MobyGames

External links[edit]