Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Buenos Aires

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Archdiocese of Buenos Aires
Archidioecesis Bonaerensis
Arquidiócesis de Buenos Aires
Facade BA Metropolitan Church.jpg
Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral
Location
Country Argentina
Territory Buenos Aires
Ecclesiastical province Buenos Aires
Metropolitan Buenos Aires
Statistics
Area 78 sq mi (200 km2)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2012)
2,917,000
2,671,000 (91.6%)
Parishes 183
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Rite Roman Rite
Established 6 April 1620
Cathedral Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral
Patron saint Nuestra Señora del Buen Aire
Secular priests 460
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Metropolitan Archbishop Mario Poli
Auxiliary Bishops
Emeritus Bishops
Website
www.arzbaires.org.ar

The Archdiocese of Buenos Aires (Archidioecesis Bonaerensis) is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Catholic Church based on the autonomous city of Buenos Aires, the capital of Argentina. Its mother church is the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral. On 13 March 2013, then-Archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected as Pope, under the name of Francis. The current archbishop, since 28 March 2013, is Mario Aurelio Poli, appointed by Pope Francis to succeed him as Archbishop of Buenos Aires.

The territory of the Archdiocese has an area of 203 km² and a population of 2,729,610 (2005), of which around 2.5 million are Catholic, served by 182 parishes. It is divided into the four zonal vicaries of Flores, Devoto, Belgrano, and Centro which are further subdivided into 20 deaconates.

The archdiocese has 11 suffragans, corresponding to the dioceses of Avellaneda-Lanús, Gregorio de Laferrere, Lomas de Zamora, Merlo-Moreno, Morón, San Charbel of Buenos Aires (Maronite), San Isidro, San Justo, San Martín, San Miguel, and Santa María del Patrocinio en Buenos Aires (Ukrainian).

The diocese was erected on 6 April 1620 as an offshoot of the Diocese of Paraguay and was elevated to archdiocese on 5 March 1866. It has since lost large parts of its territory to the new dioceses of Montevideo, Paraná, La Plata, and Viedma; however, the Archbishop of Buenos Aires remains the ceremonial Primate of Argentina.[2][3][4]


List of ordinaries[edit]

The following is a list of ordinaries, since the erection of the diocese on 6 April 1620:

Bishops[edit]

  1. Pedro Carranza Salinas, O. Carm.(30 Mar 1620 Appointed – 29 Feb 1632 Died, first bishop)
  2. Cristóbal de Aresti Martínez de Aguilar, O.S.B. (3 Dec 1635 Appointed – 1641 Died)
  3. Cristóbal de la Mancha y Velazco, O.P. (31 Aug 1641 Appointed – 4 Jul 1673 Died)
  4. Antonio de Azcona Imberto (9 May 1676 Appointed – 19 Feb 1700 Died)
  5. Gabriel de Arregui, O.F.M. (23 Jun 1712 Appointed – 1716 Appointed, Bishop of Cuzco)
  6. Pedro de Fajardo, O.SS.T. (22 May 1713 Appointed – 16 Dec 1729 Died)
  7. Juan de Arregui, O.F.M. (22 Nov 1730 Appointed – 19 Dec 1736 Died)
  8. José de Peralta Barrionuevo y Rocha Benavídez, O.P. (19 May 1738 Appointed – 14 Jun 1746 Appointed, Bishop of La Paz)
  9. Cayetano Marcellano y Agramont (23 Jan 1749 Appointed – 23 May 1757 Appointed, Bishop of Trujillo)
  10. José Antonio Basurco y Herrera (2 Apr 1757 Appointed – 5 Feb 1761 Died)
  11. Manuel Antonio de la Torre (14 Jul 1762 Appointed – 20 Oct 1776 Died)
  12. Sebastián Malvar y Pinto, O.F.M. (19 Oct 1777 Appointed – 15 Dec 1783 Appointed, Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela)
  13. Manuel Azamor y Ramírez (27 Jan 1785 Appointed – 2 Oct 1796 Died)
  14. Pedro Inocencio Bejarano (3 Jul 1797 Appointed – 23 Feb 1801 Appointed, Bishop of Sigüenza)
  15. Benito Lué y Riega (9 Aug 1802 Appointed – 22 Mar 1812 Died)
  16. Mariano Medrano y Cabrera (7 Oct 1829 Appointed – 7 Apr 1851 Died)

Archbishops (cardinals in italics)[edit]

  1. Mariano José de Escalada Bustillo y Zeballos (23 Jun 1854 Appointed – 28 Jul 1870 Died, first archbishop)
  2. Federico León Aneiros (Aneyros) (25 Jul 1873 Appointed – 3 Sep 1894 Died)
  3. Uladislao Castellano (12 Sep 1895 Appointed – 6 Feb 1900 Died)
  4. Mariano Antonio Espinosa (24 Aug 1900 Appointed – 8 Apr 1923 Died)
  5. José María Bottaro y Hers, O.F.M. (9 Sep 1926 Appointed – 20 Jul 1932 Resigned)
  6. Santiago Copello (20 Sep 1932 Appointed – 25 Mar 1959 Appointed, Chancellor of the Apostolic Chancery, first cardinal)
  7. Fermín Emilio Lafitte (25 Mar 1959 Succeeded – 8 Aug 1959 Died)
  8. Antonio Caggiano (15 Aug 1959 Appointed – 22 Apr 1975 Retired)
  9. Juan Carlos Aramburu (22 Apr 1975 Succeeded – 10 Jul 1990 Retired)
  10. Antonio Quarracino (10 Jul 1990 Appointed – 28 Feb 1998 Died)
  11. Jorge Mario Bergoglio, S.J. (28 Feb 1998 Succeeded – 13 Mar 2013, elected Pope Francis)
  12. Mario Aurelio Poli (28 Mar 2013 Appointed)

See also[edit]

References[edit]