Shure SM57

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The Shure SM57 microphone

The Shure SM57 is a low-impedance, unidirectional, dynamic microphone made by Shure Incorporated and commonly used in live sound reinforcement and studio recording. It is one of the best-selling microphones in the world. It is used extensively in amplified music and has been used by every U.S. president since its introduction in 1965.[1] In 2004, honoring its four decades of "solid, dependable performance", it was inducted into the first-ever TEC Awards TECnology Hall of Fame.[1]

Background[edit]

The origin of SM57 may be traced to 1937, when Shure engineer Ben Bauer developed the first single-element directional microphone, the Unidyne, which had a cardioid pickup pattern.[1] In 1959, another Shure engineer, Ernie Seeler, advanced the art of microphone design significantly with the Unidyne III.[1] Seeler torture-tested the Unidyne III during three years of research and development and thereby, produced the SM series of rugged and reliable Shure microphone capsules.[1] The "SM" stands for Studio Microphone;[2] Seeler was an aficionado of classical music and expected the SM57 to be used for orchestras. He "despised" rock music, but ironically, the microphone ended up being widely used during amplified concerts,[1] and has become an industry standard for snare drums, toms, guitar amps and other components of rock groups.

Characteristics[edit]

The SM57 uses the same capsule as the popular SM58, but has some mechanical and acoustical differences. Like the SM58, the SM57 is fitted with an XLR connector and features a balanced output, which helps to minimize electrical hum and noise pickup. According to Shure, the frequency response extends from 40 Hertz (Hz) to 15 kHz. The SM57 is manufactured in the USA, Mexico, and China.

The Shure A2WS is an accessory windscreen for the SM57 that attenuates wind noise and plosives ("pop" sounds), and protects the microphone capsule.

Use[edit]

Shure SM57 microphones with A2WS windscreens installed on the lectern of the president of the United States. The microphone kit (two SM57 microphones, windscreens, microphone stands, and black right-angle XLR cables) is referred to as the VIP/high profile microphone kit.

The SM57 is a popular musicians' choice due to its sturdy construction and ability to work well with instruments that produce high sound pressure levels, such as percussion instruments and electric guitars. The School of Audio Engineering (SAE) recommends the SM57 (along with other makes and models) for four roles in a drum kit: kick drum, snare drum, rack toms, and floor tom.[3] The cardioid pickup pattern of the microphone reduces the pickup of unwanted background sound and the generation of acoustic feedback. SM57s have also been a staple when reinforcing the sound from guitar amplifiers.

Every U.S. president since Lyndon B. Johnson has delivered speeches through an SM57.[1] It became the lectern microphone of the White House Communications Agency in 1965, the year of its introduction and remains so.[4]

Due to its popularity, the SM57 has been counterfeited frequently by manufacturers in China and Thailand.[5] Shure Distribution UK reports that the SM57, SM58, Beta 57A, and Beta 58A are their microphones that are most commonly counterfeited.[6] In 2006, Shure mounted a campaign against the trading of counterfeit microphones.[7]

Specifications[edit]

Type
Dynamic
Frequency Response
40 to 15,000 Hz
Polar Pattern
Cardioid
Sensitivity (at 1,000 Hz Open Circuit Voltage)
-56.0 dBV/Pa (at 1,000 Hz)
Impedance
Rated impedance is 150 ohms (300 ohms actual) for connection to microphone inputs rated low impedance
Connector
Three-pin professional audio connector (male XLR type)
Produced
1965–present

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]