SS-Begleitkommando des Führers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
SS-Begleitkommando des Führers; Führerbegleitkommando
Active 1932 - 1945
Country  Nazi Germany
Allegiance Axis
Branch Flag Schutzstaffel.svg Schutzstaffel
Role Body guards

SS-Begleitkommando des Führers (literally: "SS Escort Command of the Führer"), later known as the Führerbegleitkommando (Escort Command of the Führer; FBK) was originally an eight-man SS squad assigned with protecting the life of Adolf Hitler during the early 1930s. It was expanded and remained responsible for Hitler's personal protection until 30 April 1945.

Formation[edit]

It was formed on 29 February 1932 to protect Hitler while he travelled outside Munich and the borders of Bavaria in Germany. In 1934, the Führerschutzkommando replaced the SS-Begleitkommando des Führers for Hitler's overall protection throughout Germany. The Führerschutzkommando was officially renamed the Reichssicherheitsdienst (Reich Security Service; RSD) on 1 August 1935.[1]

Expansion and renamed[edit]

The Begleitkommando des Führers was expanded and renamed the Führerbegleitkommando (Escort Command of the Führer; FBK).[2] The additional members for the FBK were drawn from 1st SS Panzer Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler.[3] Hitler used them for guard duty, but also as orderlies, valets, waiters, and couriers.[3] The FBK continued under separate command and remained responsible for Hitler's personal protection.[4] The FBK accompanied Hitler on all his travels and was always present at the several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe.[5]

The last FBK commander was SS-Obersturmbannführer Franz Schädle who was appointed on 5 January 1945, after the dismissal of Bruno Gesche.[6] Thereafter, Schädle and the FBK accompanied Hitler (and his entourage) into the bunker complex under the Reich Chancellery gardens in the central government sector of Berlin.[6] By 23 April 1945, Schädle commanded approximately 30 members of the unit who stood guard therein for Hitler until his suicide on 30 April 1945.[7]

Original members[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hoffmann 2000, p. 36.
  2. ^ Joachimsthaler 1999, pp. 16, 287.
  3. ^ a b O'Donnell 1978, p. 101.
  4. ^ Joachimsthaler 1999, pp. 16, 287, 293.
  5. ^ Joachimsthaler 1999, p. 293.
  6. ^ a b c d Joachimsthaler 1999, pp. 293, 294.
  7. ^ O'Donnell 1978, p. 97.
  8. ^ Kempka 2010, p. 9.

Bibliography[edit]