Sakuramochi

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Sakuramochi
Sakuramochi.jpg
Kansai-style sakura mochi
Type confectionery
Place of origin
Japan
Region or state
Japanese-speaking areas
Main ingredients
sweet pink mochi (rice cake), red bean paste, sakura leaf
Other information
Traditionally consumed on Hinamatsuri (Girl's Day)
Cookbook:Sakuramochi  Sakuramochi
Sakura mochi(Tokyo style)
Sakura mochi (A variation of Kansai style)

Sakuramochi (桜餅?) is a variety of wagashi, or Japanese confectionery consisting of a sweet pink mochi (rice cake) and red bean paste, covered with a leaf of sakura (cherry blossom). The sakura leaf is edible.

The style of sakuramochi differs by region. Basically, the east of Japan such as Tokyo uses shiratama-ko (白玉粉?, rice flour) and the west side such as Kansai uses dōmyōji-ko (道明寺粉?, glutinous rice flour) for batter.

Recipe[edit]

This recipe is for making sakuramochi. Serves 8.

Ingredients[edit]

  • 3/4 cup glutinous rice flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 3/4 cup red bean paste
  • red food coloring (optional)
  • 8 sakura leaves pickled in salted water

Preparation[edit]

Wash pickled sakura leaves and dry. Boil water in a pan. Mix glutinous flour in the water. Cover the pan with a lid and leave it for 5 minutes. Place a wet cloth in a steamer and put the dough on the cloth. Steam the dough for about 20 minutes over medium heat. Remove the steamed dough and place into a bowl. Mash the dough slightly with a wooden pestle, mixing sugar into the dough. Dissolve a little bit of red food color in some water. Add some of the red water in the dough and mix well. Divide the pink mochi into 8 balls. Flatten each mochi ball by hand and place red bean paste filling on the dough. Wrap the filling with mochi and round by hand. Wrap each mochi with a sakura leaf.

Usage[edit]

The interior of a sakuramochi, showing the red-bean paste inside.

In Japan, Sakuramochi is traditionally eaten on Girl's Day (also known as Hinamatsuri) on March 3. Sakuramochi is also eaten at Hanami, from late March to early May.

See also[edit]