Scott Brockenshire

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Scott Brockenshire
150600 - Scott Brockenshire - 3a - 2000 Sydney media guide scan.jpg
2000 Australian Paralympic Team portrait of Brockenshire
Personal information
Nationality  Australia
Born (1969-03-01) 1 March 1969 (age 46)
Prahran, Victoria


Australian S10 swimmer Scott Brockenshire (centre) leaves the blocks at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games

Scott Brockenshire (born 1 March 1969)[1] is an Australian Paralympic swimmer, who has won six medals at the 1996 Atlanta and 2000 Sydney Paralympics.

Biography[edit]

Brockenshire was born in the Melbourne suburb of Prahran and lives in the Northern Rivers of New South Wales.[1][2] He was born without a tibia and a shortened femur on his left leg, and at the age of eighteen months, his left foot was amputated.[3] He began swimming at the age of about ten to improve his fitness.[2] He won medals in able-bodied surf lifesaving competitions[3] and was the state surf ski champion in 1987.[1] He was inspired to take up competitive swimming after watching the events for people with disabilities at the 1994 Victoria Commonwealth Games in Canada.[2]

At the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics, he won a silver medal in the Men's 4x100 m Freestyle S7–10 event and two bronze medals in the Men's 100 m Butterfly S10 and Men's 50 m Freestyle S10 events.[4] In the final for the men's 4x100 m freestyle event, he was responsible for narrowing the British lead and keeping his relay team competitive.[5] At the 2000 Sydney Paralympics, he won a silver medal in the Men's 4x100 m Freestyle 34 pts event and two bronze medals in the Men's 100 m Butterfly S10 and Men's 100 m Freestyle S10 events.[4]

Brockenshire inspired New Zealand Paralympian Steven Yates to take up disabled sport.[6]

He worked in Ballina, New South Wales as the manager of a gym.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Australians at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics: Swimming". Australian Sports Commission. Archived from the original on 20 January 2000. 
  2. ^ a b c "Australia Day in Guyra Shire". The Guyra Argus. 25 January 2010. Retrieved 18 May 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "One Hundred Percent" (YouTube video). Queensland University of Technology. 2 June 2011. Retrieved 18 May 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Athlete Search Results". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 May 2012. 
  5. ^ Long, Giles (2010). Changing to win : an incredible story of courage and a template for success. London, United Kingdom: Piatkus. p. 130. ISBN 978-0-7481-1804-5. Retrieved 18 May 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "Steven's golden Paralympics". University of Technology, Sydney. 7 April 2003. Retrieved 4 November 2011.