Securing Adolescents from Exploitation-Online Act of 2007

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The Securing Adolescents From Exploitation-Online Act of 2007 (H.R. 3791) is a U.S. House bill stating that anyone offering an open Wi-Fi Internet connection to the public, who "obtains actual knowledge of any facts or circumstances" in relation to illegal visual media such as "child pornography" transferred over that connection, must register a report of their knowledge to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.[1] The act references US Code sections 2251, 2251A, 2252, 2252A, 2252B, 2260, and 1466A in defining its scope. Anyone failing to report their knowledge faces fines of up to $300,000.[2] It was written by Nick Lampson[1] and introduced in the House of Representatives on October 10, 2007. It was approved (409-2-20) on December 5, 2007, with only Republicans Ron Paul and Paul Broun voting against.[3] Some commentators criticized it as overly broad,[1] but Lampson's spokesman dismissed these interpretations, saying that the act was not intended to cover Americans who had wireless routers at home, but only to target their internet service providers.[4]

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