Steyr TMP

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For other uses, see TMP.
TMP
Steyr TMP 9mmPara 001.jpg
The Steyr TMP
Type Machine pistol
Place of origin  Austria
Service history
Used by See Users
Production history
Designer Friedrich Aigner
Designed 1989
Manufacturer Steyr Mannlicher
Produced 1992–2001
Variants SPP
Specifications
Weight 1.3 kg (2.9 lb) empty
Length 282 mm (11.10 in.)
Barrel length 130 mm (5.12 in.) [1]

Cartridge 9x19mm Parabellum
Action Short recoil, locking rotating barrel, delayed blowback
Rate of fire 850–900 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity 400 m/s (1,312 ft/s)
Effective firing range 100 m
Feed system 15, 20, or 30-round detachable box magazine

The Steyr TMP (Taktische Maschinenpistole/Tactical Machine Pistol) is a select-fire 9x19mm Parabellum caliber machine pistol manufactured by Steyr Mannlicher of Austria. The Magazines come in 15-, 20-, or 30-round detachable box types. A suppressor can also be fitted. The Steyr SPP is the civilian variant of the TMP which has no foregrip and is capable of semi-automatic fire only.

In 2001, Steyr sold the design to Brügger & Thomet[2] who developed it into the Brügger & Thomet MP9.[3]

The CMP150 in the game Perfect Dark on Nintendo 64 was based on the Steyr TMP[4]

SPP[edit]

The Steyr SPP (Special Purpose Pistol) is a semi-automatic variant of the TMP. The TMP's barrel and barrel jacket lengths were increased slightly so there is a greater length of protruding jacket and barrel. The forward tactical handle was removed and a small Picatinny rail installed on the forward handguard instead. It is somewhat large for a pistol and is constructed mainly from synthetic materials.[5]

Users[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miller, David (2001). The Illustrated Directory of 20th Century Guns. Salamander Books Ltd. ISBN 1-84065-245-4.
  2. ^ "Brugger & Thomet MP9 at Modern Firearms". Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  3. ^ "The MP9". Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  4. ^ http://www.imfdb.org/wiki/Perfect_Dark
  5. ^ Bonds, Ray; David Miller (2003). Illustrated Directory of Special Forces. Zenith Imprint. p. 224. ISBN 978-0-7603-1419-7. 
  6. ^ http://www.bmi.gv.at/cms/BMI_EKO_Cobra/publikationen/files/LawOrder.pdf
  7. ^ Meyr, Eitan (January 6, 1999). "Special Weapons for Counter-terrorist Units". Jane's — Law Enforcement. Retrieved 2009-09-26. [dead link]

External links[edit]