Stinson Detroiter

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Detroiter
Stinson Detroiter.jpg
Role Utility monoplane
National origin United States
Manufacturer Stinson Aircraft Syndicate
Stinson Aircraft Company
First flight 25 January 1926
Number built 100+
Variants Stinson Junior

The Stinson Detroiter was a six-seat cabin monoplane for passengers or freight designed and built by the Stinson Aircraft Syndicate, later the Stinson Aircraft Corporation.

Development[edit]

The first design from the Detroit based Stinson Aircraft Syndicate was the Stinson SB-1 Detroiter a four-seat cabin biplane which had novel features such as cabin heating, individual wheel brakes and electric starter for the nose-mounted 220 hp (164 kW) Wright J-5 Whirlwind engine. The Harley Davidson brakes were demonstrated on a snowy maiden flight requiring wheel chains to be added to prevent skidding.[1] This aircraft was soon developed into the six-seat Stinson SM-1D Detroiter a braced high-wing monoplane version which made its first flight on 25 January 1926.[2] The aircraft was soon a success and it enabled Stinson to get $150,000 in public capital to incorporate the Stinson Aircraft Corporation on 4 May 1926.[2]

Seventy-five of the Wright J-5 powered versions were built followed by 30 Wright J-6 powered aircraft. From 1928, SM-1 aircraft were used on scheduled services by Paul Braniff's Braniff Air Lines and by Northwest Airways.[3]

In 1930 a SM-1FS with a crew of three reached Bermuda from New York City, the first time a flight had been made to the islands. Getting there the aircraft had to land twice, once because of darkness and later after running out of fuel. With a wing strut damaged, it was shipped back to New York.[4]

In 1928 Stinson developed the smaller SM-2 Junior model to appeal to private owners.

Variants[edit]

SB-1 Detroiter
Original biplane version with a 220hp (164kW) Wright J-5 Whirlwind engine. 26 units built. Prototype sold to Horace Elgin Dodge, first production model sold to John Duval Dodge of Dodgeson.[5]
SM-1D
High-wing monoplane version with a 220hp (164kW) Wright J-5 Whirlwind engine.
SM-1DA
As SM-1D with detailed improvements.
SM-1DB
As SM-1D with minor improvements
SM-1DC
As SM-1D with detailed improvements.
SM-1DD
Freighter variant with two-seats and cargo-carrying interior, one built.
SM-1DE
Freighter variant with two-seats and cargo-carrying interior, one built.
SM-1F
Variant from 1929 with a 300hp (224kW) Wright J-6 engine.
SM-1D300
SM-1Ds modified with a 300hp (224kW) Wright J-6 engine.
SM-1FS
Floatplane variant of the SM-1F.
SM-6B
A larger capacity six-seat variant with a 450hp (336kW) Pratt & Whitney Wasp C1 radial engine, two were built followed by eight more with eight-seat interiors.

Operators[edit]

 Republic of China
 Peru
 United States
 Honduras

Specifications (SM-1F)[edit]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1 pilot
  • Capacity: 6 passengers
  • Length: 32 ft 0 in ( m)
  • Wingspan: 46 ft 8 in (14.22 m)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Wright J-6, 300 hp (224 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 132 mph (212 km/h)

See also[edit]

Related development
Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ John A. Bluth. Stinson Aircraft Company. p. 26. 
  2. ^ a b Stinson Aircraft Corporation
  3. ^ Davies, 1998, p. 734
  4. ^ UNUSUAL PLACE - UNUSUAL STORY - HEROIC CREW
  5. ^ John A. Bluth. Stinson Aircraft Company. p. 27. 
  6. ^ http://www.cnac.org/history01.htm
  7. ^ http://gregcrouch.com/2010/stinson-detroiter
  8. ^ "Airlines of the World: The Americas – Cia de Aviacion Faucett" (PDF). Flight: 420. 28 April 1938. Retrieved 1 March 2012. 
Bibliography
  • Davies, R.E.G. (1998). Airlines of the United States since 1914. Smithsonian Institution Press. ISBN 1-888962-08-9. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. 
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing. 
  • Simpson, R.W. (1991). Airlife's General Aviation. England: Airlife Publishing. ISBN 1-85310-194-X. 

External links[edit]