Sud-Ouest Bretagne

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S.O.30 Bretagne
SO.30P Bretagne No.40 Aeronavale Palas jets BLA 09.55.jpg
SO.30P of the Aeronavale equipped with under-wing Palas auxiliary jets at Blackbushe Airport in 1955
Role Airliner and military transport
Manufacturer Sud-Ouest
First flight 26 February 1945
Primary users Air France
French Air Force
Number built 45

The Sud-Ouest S.O.30 Bretagne was a 1940s French airliner built by Sud-Ouest.

Design and devopment[edit]

The Bretagne was designed by a group of designers and engineers who were based at Cannes from May 1941 following the invasion of France. The design was for a medium capacity civil transport, a twin-engined mid-wing cantilever all-metal monoplane. The prototype (designated the S.O.30N) first flew on 26 February 1945.

Operational history[edit]

The initial production version was designated the S.O.30P Bretagne with two versions with different engines. The aircraft operated with a crew of five and could carry between 30 and 43 passengers. A cargo version (the S.O.30C) with a revised interior and strengthened floor and large cargo door. The aircraft was operated as an airliner, but mainly by the French military forces as a medium transport.

Some aircraft were fitted with two underwing Turbomeca Palas turbojet engines for auxiliary power. Other aircraft were used for engine-trials fitted with the SNECMA Atar 101 and licence-built Rolls-Royce Nene turbojets.

Variants[edit]

Operators[edit]

Military operators[edit]

 France

Civil operators[edit]

 Algeria
 France
 Morocco

Specifications (S.O.30P-2)[edit]

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1953–54[1]

General characteristics

Performance

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Bridgman 1953, pp. 152–153.
Bibliography
  • Bridgeman, Leonard. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1953–54. London: Jane's All The World's Aircraft Publishing Company, 1953.
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). London: Orbis Publishing, 1985.