Talk:Albemarle Sound

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Albemarle Sound is a body of generally fresh water Nor brackish? Wetman 19:41, 14 Mar 2004 (UTC)

I cribbed that from the Columbia Gazeteer's wording. I would have thought brackish too, but I don't know what the tidal inflow is, and what degree of mixing there is. -- Decumanus 19:45, 14 Mar 2004 (UTC)
I replaced "body of generally fresh water" with a link to "estuary". The estuary page says that a key trait of estuaries is the mixing of fresh water from rivers and salt water from tides. And anyway, unless I'm totally confused, Albemarle Sound is a classic example of an estuary. Pfly 05:00, 8 August 2006 (UTC)

I've noticed changing categories, adding/removing of Category:Sounds of North Carolina and Category:Estuaries of North Carolina. It seems odd to me that there are categories at this level of detail, but for what it's worth, Albermarle Sound is both a sound and an estuary, as are all the sounds of North Carolina. I don't think it is an either/or thing. Pfly 19:36, 11 March 2007 (UTC)

This is beginning to be a problem. Let's discuss it. Wikipedia talk:WikiProject North Carolina#Category Discussion: Estuary, Sound, or Lagoon? --TinMan 03:00, 3 April 2007 (UTC)
The Albemarle Sound is definately brackish. I've seen the salt wedge come up so far that there were actually saltwater fish and other animals as far up as the NC 32 bridge and further. W4otn 04:57 30 December 2007 —Preceding comment was added at 04:57, 30 December 2007 (UTC)