Talk:Quenching

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Other meaning[edit]

[1] says that quench is also "To put out (a fire, for example); extinguish". In fact, this is the first entry. Shouldn't this appear in the article or in the disambiguity page somewhere?Renato (talk) 21:24, 28 July 2008 (UTC)

I'll add a link to wiktionary to account for that. --Wizard191 (talk) 20:26, 23 September 2008 (UTC)

LHC: Magnetic quench[edit]

The recent shutdown of the LHC has been attributed to a quench - which in this case led to dramatic heating, so not cooling as currently discussed here. JEH (talk) 20:21, 23 September 2008 (UTC)

The dab page quenching (disambiguation) has an entry for that. --Wizard191 (talk) 20:23, 23 September 2008 (UTC)

Article needs to be split[edit]

The first part is all about Quench (metallurgy), the later part is about quenching in scrubbers, which should go it that article. These are different topics and deserve different articles. That's why we have disambiguation pages. The link to the scrubber content could go just after the statement on the disambiguation page about "evaporative cooling". 65.0.209.205 (talk) 03:07, 4 October 2009 (UTC)

Agreed! Wizard191 (talk) 19:08, 4 October 2009 (UTC)


Quenching media[edit]

How about polymers mix? It's not same as oil... I'm talking about things like Polyalkylene Glycol and others like that. Or you guys think that's not considered a different media since it's usually aqueous ? Well, i'm not sure too. --R2cyberpunk (talk) 02:22, 24 October 2009 (UTC)


I've found in interesting article that could help expand this section. Heres the referance and link.
Title: Comparison of the quenching capacities of hot salt and oil baths. Rassizadehghani, J.; Raygan, Sh.; Askari, M.. Metal Science & Heat Treatment, May2006, Vol. 48 Issue 5/6, p193-198 ([2])
If the link doesn’t work, the reference may need to be found through your library. It focuses on oil and salt, so not much info of air and just water. I think there’s lots of good info in it, especially about the types of salt baths and how their composition effects their capacity for removing heat. Alister 77 (talk) 03:22, 1 October 2010 (UTC)
FYI...The link doesn't work. Wizard191 (talk) 12:50, 1 October 2010 (UTC)

Misleading statement[edit]

This line appears to be misleading: "For instance, it can reduce crystallinity and thereby increase toughness of both alloys and plastics (produced through polymerization)." Regardless of phase the steel has a crystalline microstructure, what changes with temperature is the size of grain boundaries. The metal doesn't become more or less crystalline in quenching. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 143.167.215.111 (talk) 23:12, 15 February 2011 (UTC)

You are right that "crystallinity" isn't the right word. Please fix it. Wizard191 (talk) 23:19, 15 February 2011 (UTC)

Coke Quenching Car[edit]

In the picture [3], what is the quenching referred to? Is the quenching referred to that of cooling the coke? 204.210.242.157 (talk) 13:43, 12 October 2011 (UTC)

Removed section: Quenching distance[edit]

Quenching distance is an important property in the study of combustion. It is defined as the smallest hole a flame can travel through. For example hydrogen has a quenching distance of 0.64 mm.{{Citation needed}}

  • This section appears to be irrelevant, as it seems to refer to quenching (extinguishing) of a fire. - Mike Rosoft (talk) 19:22, 5 January 2014 (UTC)