Talk:Saltbox

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Untitled[edit]

To do: look at incorporating pictures from the LoC page referenced under External links. The Rights and Restrictions Information says that "Material in these collections is generally considered to be in the public domain." That sounds promising.

--DavidConrad 04:43, 24 Jun 2005 (UTC)


Captain William Smith House[edit]

I changed the caption on the first picture. The house is in Lincoln, MA, and that seems a much better description than saying it's "outside Concord, MA". In Lincoln, rather than outside of Concord. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 139.68.134.1 (talk) 14:45, 6 May 2008 (UTC)

Actual Saltbox[edit]

If someone has a picture, it may be informative to have side-by-side pictures of a saltbox house and an old fashioned saltbox (the ones the houses were named after). -- 128.104.112.85 (talk) 17:07, 6 May 2008 (UTC)

The picture of the Comfort Starr House in Guilford, CT is a perfect example of a classic 17th century Connecticut Saltbox house. It was originally just a one-room deep house then they added a lean-to addition across the back making it into a Saltbox. Tomticker5 (talk) 00:29, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

Origins[edit]

I think it reads a little misleadingly to say the saltbox "is a building with a long, pitched roof that slopes down to the back, generally a wooden frame house. Historians claim it was first built by Thomas and Samuel Fox of Concord, Mass. A saltbox has just one story in the back and two stories in the front." This ought to be refined to "a type of American vernacular architecture with a long pitched roof etc..." as otherwise it suggests that the building type in the US was its first occurrence. It is not really an American invention, but rather it is a European architectural style that was adapted to the particular needs of the Colonies, especially with the advent of the tax. This distinctive roof type was known in medieval England long before the settling of the Colonies (for example, also another glossary), where it is known as a catslide or outshut roof. 81.129.134.12 (talk) 13:01, 6 June 2011 (UTC)

Old English[edit]

Page 65 of Albion's Seed traces it to a pattern common in East England (East Anglia & Kent) giving a drawing of one from Kent circa early 1600's. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.48.174.224 (talk) 23:25, 24 February 2013 (UTC)

Wyckoff House[edit]

The wycoff house does not seem to have the asymmetrical roof that defines the saltbox house. Its article, however describes at as a saltbox. Is it just a saltbox pretender? ViniTheHat (talk) 13:39, 6 June 2011 (UTC)

Prank edits[edit]

Is the edit "Latest revision as of 02:47, 23 February 2014" a prank edit? In this edit, the first sentence went from "A 'saltbox' is a building with a long, pitched roof..." to "A Super duper tiger 'saltbox' is a building with a long, pitched roof...." I am questioning the addition of "Super duper tiger" here. Eyescorp (talk) 05:40, 23 February 2014 (UTC)