Talk:The Monk

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Comment[edit]

No longer a stub apparently though still invites expansion. Julia Rossi (talk) 11:50, 23 February 2008 (UTC)

Correction?[edit]

"It is also the first book to feature a priest as the villain." Schedoni, the villain in 'The Italian' by Ann Radcliffe, is also a priest. Both novels were publisched in 1796. Which one appeared first? --85.60.4.173 (talk) 15:02, 3 March 2010 (UTC)

The Monk appeared first and was a direct influence on Radcliffe's The Italian. Colin4C (talk) 17:59, 3 March 2010 (UTC)

Anti-Feminism' of Lewis' - POV?[edit]

The whole section on 'Anti-Feminism' is absurdly anachronistic and written by some militant lefty. Lewis cannot be judged by the 21-st-century standards of PC. He is no more 'anti-feminist' than any 18th-century male writer and indeed less than many. The very fact that Agnes is seen by him as marriageable after having an illegitimate baby by other man than her would-be husband, is exteremely 'progressive' in the society where girls who had lost their virginity before marriage would be routinely jailed. Never read 'Tom Jones' by Fielding?212.13.96.18 (talk) 09:10, 5 October 2011 (UTC)

While it appears this section is original research (cites the book itelf rather than any critical source) I have to say there is a distinctly "anti-feminist" - for lack of a better term - slant to the novel. Agnes is punished for wanting to escape a loopy family, Matilda is a frickin' demon, and every woman over 30 is either stupidly wrong about damn near everything (Elvira's only moment of getting something right is realizing Ambrosio wants to do her daughter) or psychopathically vindictive (the prioress) or both (Agnes's aunt). I'd say including some commentary on this is warranted but it should definitely be sourced. If we can have long digressions on anti-semitism in the Gogol or Dostoevsky pages (also fair for its day) we can certainly include Lewis's lady-issues. Bardam0 (talk) 16:21, 6 October 2011 (UTC)

Politics aside[edit]

The anti-feminist and gender sections are idiosyncratic academic readings, and shouldn't be presented as facts. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 205.215.254.235 (talk) 14:00, 7 September 2012 (UTC)

Influence[edit]

Isn't this novel chiefly significant for spawning the gothic genre (amongst various others?). I could have done with some more info on that. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 78.149.199.177 (talk) 19:19, 1 October 2013 (UTC)