Tap tap

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a tap tap bus used for longer journeys

Tap taps are gaily painted buses[1] or pick-up trucks[2] that serve as share taxis in Haiti. They may also be referred to as camionette.[3]

Literally meaning "quick quick",[4] these vehicles for hire are privately owned and ornately decorated.[1] They follow fixed routes, won't leave until filled with passengers, and riders can disembark at any point in the journey.[5]

Decoration[edit]

Tap tap in Carrefour, Haiti.

Often painted with religious names or slogans,[4] the tap tap is known for its lavish decoration, and many feature wild colors, portraits of famous people, and intricate, hand-cut wooden window covers.[1]

Travel warnings[edit]

tap tap cab in Port-au-Prince

Many developed countries inform their citizens to not take tap taps when visiting Haiti.

Canada[edit]

While saying not to use any form of public transport in Haiti, the Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada advises against tap tap travel especially.[6]

US[edit]

The US State Department warns travelers not to use tap taps "because they are often overloaded, mechanically unsound, and driven unsafely."[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Haiti's 'Tap Tap' Bus Art Flourishes After Quake PBS Newshour, March 30, 2010
  2. ^ Haiti: Tap-taps traveladventures.org
  3. ^ Paul Clammer, Michael Grosberg, Jens Porup (2008). Dominican Republic and Haiti (4th ed.). Lonely Planet. p. 355. ISBN 9781741042924. 
  4. ^ a b Tap-tap, fula-fula, kia-kia: The Haitian bus in Atlantic perspective. Thompson, Robert Farris. African Arts. Los Angeles: Spring 1996. Vol. 29, Iss. 2; p. 36
  5. ^ My Haiti Picture for today : Tap-Tap katianovetsaintlot.blogspot.com, February 9, 2010
  6. ^ TRAVEL REPORT Haiti: 9. Travel and Currency Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada Official Site
  7. ^ Travel Warning: Haiti US Department of State Official Site, January 20, 2011

See also[edit]