Two Tickets to Paradise

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For the 2006 film, see Two Tickets to Paradise (film).
"Two Tickets to Paradise"
Single by Eddie Money
from the album Eddie Money
B-side "Don't Worry"
Released June 24, 1978
Format 7" single
Recorded 1977
Genre Hard rock
Length 4:00 (Album Version)
3:09 (Single Remix)
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Eddie Money
Producer(s) Bruce Botnick
Eddie Money singles chronology
"Baby Hold On"
(1978)
"Two Tickets to Paradise"
(1978)
"You've Really Got a Hold on Me"
(1979)

"Two Tickets to Paradise" is a song by American rock singer, Eddie Money, from his 1977 album Eddie Money. It was released as a single in June 1978 and reached number 22 on the Billboard Hot 100.[1]

Background and content[edit]

Money wrote the song about his girlfriend at the time. His girlfriend's mother wanted her to marry a doctor or a lawyer, not a musician. Money wrote the song in the hope of being allowed to take his girlfriend on holiday.

Release[edit]

The 45 RPM record single version of the song is considerably different from the now more familiar LP version that appears on the Eddie Money album, a vast number of Money compilation albums and MP3 digital downloads as Money had re-recorded his entire lead vocal for the 45 RPM edition. The LP version is broken up in three verses, two choruses, with a harmony section of "Whoa Whoa" right before the third verse, while the re-recorded 45 RPM version is now three verses, three choruses, (with the third verse sang over the "Whoa" harmony segment), also added were guitar riffs during the "waited so long" parts; also lyrics were changed to the chorus slightly, as instead of saying "I've got two tickets to paradise, I've got two tickets to paradise" right after saying "pack your bags, we leave tonight" is now "Baby, it'll be so nice, for I've got two tickets to paradise". The mix is also substantially different, and new and different lead guitar parts appear throughout. Lastly, the LP version ends with a conclusive bongo/drum ending; whereas the 45 version uses a "fade away rhythm," dj style close. The 45 RPM version runs at 3:07 minutes. Most U.S. radio stations, inclusively, air the wider available LP version, where radio stations that specifically only format the hit-single versions of oldies, will digitize themselves the 45 RPM record for airplay. The 45 RPM version has been reissued on the Playlist: The Very Best of Eddie Money compilation CD. The guitar solo was performed by Jimmy Lyon.

In popular culture[edit]

"Two Tickets to Paradise" was first used in a video game, Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, on the fictional Classic rock radio station K-DST.

The song appears on an episode of the TV show Unhitched.

The song appears in the episode "Homer Loves Flanders" of The Simpsons, in which Homer sings and plays the air guitar to the rock song.

Michael Scott of The Office sings a short, parodied version of the song in the episode "A Benihana Christmas."

It was also featured in an episode of The King of Queens where Doug Heffernan and Deacon Palmer attempt to spend $5,000 in one day, and they hire Eddie to play in Doug's living room.

The song can be heard as a background number in the film, Sideways. In one of the beginning scenes of Balls of Fury, Randy's co-performing counterpart can be seen (and heard) singing a karaoke version of the song with a parrot.

"Two Tickets to Paradise" makes an appearance in a 2012 GEICO commercial featuring Eddie Money himself. Money makes his cameo as a travel agent selling tickets to a family while waving the tickets in the air and singing the aforementioned song. The tag is that people who save money on car insurance with GEICO are happier than Eddie Money running a travel agency.

The song was made available for download on May 1, 2012 to play in Rock Band 3 Basic and PRO mode utilizing real guitar / bass guitar, and MIDI compatible electronic drum kits.

Chart positions[edit]

Charts (1978) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 22
Canadian RPM Top Singles 14

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits: Eighth Edition. Record Research. p. 443.