Unemployment Assistance Board

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The Unemployment Assistance Board was a body set up in Britain in 1934[1] due to the high levels of inter-war poverty in Britain. The Board kept a system of Means-tested benefits and did widen the number of people who could claim relief.

" The board was a constitutional innovation: a department of government with its own budget, headed not by a minister but by the six members of the board, appointed by the Minister of Labour but for whose actions he could not be held responsible".[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BBC NEWS | Programmes | Inside Money | The welfare state 1832 - 1945
  2. ^ "Reinventing the dole: a history of the Unemployment Assistance Board 1934-1940". Tony Lynes. Retrieved 27 December 2013.