Viviparidae

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Viviparidae
Temporal range: Aptian[1]-Recent
Viviparus contectus met operculum2.JPG
An alive but retracted individual of Viviparus contectus, showing the operculum
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Mollusca
Class: Gastropoda
(unranked): clade Caenogastropoda

informal group Architaenioglossa

Superfamily: Viviparoidea
Family: Viviparidae
J. E. Gray, 1847[2]
Subfamilies
Diversity[3]
125–150 freshwater species

Viviparidae, sometimes known as the river snails, are a family of large operculate freshwater snails, aquatic gastropod mollusks.

This family is classified in the informal group Architaenioglossa according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005.

Distribution[edit]

This family occurs nearly worldwide in temperate and tropical regions, with the exception that they are absent from South America.

There are two genera of Viviparidae in Africa: Bellamya and Neothauma.[4]

Taxonomy[edit]

The family Viviparidae contains 3 subfamilies (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005):

  • Viviparinae Gray, 1847 (1833) - synonyms: Paludinidae Fitzinger, 1833 (inv.); Kosoviinae Atanackovic, 1859 (n.a.)
  • Bellamyinae Rohrbach, 1937 - synonym: Amuropaludinidae Starobogatov, Prozorova, Bogatov & Sayenko, 2004 (n.a.)
  • Lioplacinae Gill, 1863 - synonym: Campelomatinae Thiele, 1929

Genera[edit]

Genera within the family Viviparidae include:

subfamily Viviparinae

subfamily Bellamyinae

subfamily Lioplacinae

subfamily ?

Life cycle[edit]

Life spans have been reported from 3 to 11 years in various species of Viviparidae.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Kear B. P., Hamilton-Bruce R. J., Smith B. J. & Gowlett-Holmes K. L. (2003). "Reassessment of Australia's oldest freshwater snail, Viviparus (?) albascopularis Etheridge, 1902 (Mollusca : Gastropoda : Viviparidae), from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian, Wallumbilla Formation) of White Cliffs, New South Wales". Molluscan Research 23(2): 149-158. doi:10.1071/MR03003, PDF.
  2. ^ Gray J. E. (November 1847) (1833). "A list of genera of Recent Mollusca, their synonyma and types". Proceedings of the Zoological Society in London, 15: 129-182. Viviparidae at page 155.
  3. ^ Strong E. E., Gargominy O., Ponder W. F. & Bouchet P. (2008). "Global Diversity of Gastropods (Gastropoda; Mollusca) in Freshwater". Hydrobiologia 595: 149-166. hdl:10088/7390 doi:10.1007/s10750-007-9012-6.
  4. ^ a b Brown D. S. (1994). Freshwater Snails of Africa and their Medical Importance. Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0-7484-0026-5.
  5. ^ a b c (file created 29 July 2010) FRESH WATER MOLLUSCAN SPECIES IN INDIA. 11 pp. accessed 31 July 2010.
  6. ^ Sivan N., Heller J. & van Damme D. (November 2006) "Fossil Viviparidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) of the Levant" Journal of Conchology 39(2): 207-220. abstract
  7. ^ a b Hamilton-Bruce R. J., Smith B. J. & Gowlett-Holmes K. L. (2002). "Descriptions of a new genus and two new species of viviparid snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Viviparidae) from the Early Cretaceous (middle-late Albian) Griman Creek Formation of Lightning Ridge, northern New South Wales". Records of the South Australian Museum 35': 193–203. PDF
  8. ^ River Snail (Notopala sublineata). accessed 26 September 2010
  9. ^ Heller J. (1990) "Longevity in molluscs". Malacologia 31(2): 259-295.

External links[edit]