Waco 9

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Waco 9
Waco 9 N452 Silver Hill MD 06.82.jpg
Waco 9 of 1925 exhibited at the NASM storage facility at Silver Hill, Maryland, in June 1982
Role three seat open cockpit biplane
National origin United States
Manufacturer Advance Aircraft Company
First flight 1925
Status about 10 survivors in 2007
Primary user barnstorming
Number built about 270

The Waco 9 is an American-built biplane design that first flew in 1925.

Development[edit]

The Waco 9 was the first of the steel-tubed fuselage aircraft designs to be built by the Advance Aircraft Company, which became the Waco Aircraft Company circa 1929. The Model 9 was a three-seat open cockpit biplane with the ailerons on the upper wings extending outboard of the main wing surfaces. About 270 Model 9 aircraft were built during 1925 and 1926.[1]

Operational history[edit]

The Model 9 was of rugged construction to meet the barnstorming requirements of the period. The cost when new was between $2,025 and $2,500. A Waco 9 was flown in the 1926 Ford National Reliability Air Tour. [2]

The Model 9 was the first aircraft type to be fitted with aluminum floats (by the EDO Corporation in 1928).[1] By 2007, a few examples remained airworthy in the USA and five aircraft were held by museums.[3]

Variants[edit]

Model 9s were fitted with a variety of engines including the 90 hp (67 kW) Curtiss OX-5, the 100 hp (75 kW) Curtiss OXX-6, 100 hp (75 kW) Curtiss C-6 and the 150 hp (112 kW) Hisso A.[1] Fitment of the various engines did not change the model number.

Operators[edit]

Military operators[edit]

 Cuba

Specifications (Model 9 with Curtiss OX-5 engine)[edit]

Data from Aerofiles

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 2 passengers
  • Length: 23 ft 4 in ( m)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 6 in ( m)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Curtiss OX-5, 90 hp ( kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 92 mph ( km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 79 mph ( km/h)
  • Stall speed: 32 mph ( km/h)
  • Range: 375-400 miles ( km)

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b c "WACO." Aerofiles. Retrieved: January 17, 20111.
  2. ^ Forden, Lesley. The Ford Air Ttours: 1925-1931. New Brighton Minnesota: Aviation Foundation of America, 2003, First edition 1972. No ISBN.
  3. ^ Ogden 2007, p. 607.
Bibliography
  • Ogden, Bob. Aviation Museums and Collections of North America. Tonbridge, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd., 2007. ISBN 0-85130-385-4.

External links[edit]