Wally Carter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Wally Carter
Personal information
Full name Wallace Frances Carter
Date of birth (1909-02-04)4 February 1909
Place of birth Carlton, Victoria
Date of death 6 June 2001(2001-06-06) (aged 92)
Place of death Melbourne
Original team Balmain
Height/Weight 175 cm / 72 kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1929-1940 North Melbourne 137 (32)
Coaching career
Years Club Games (W–L–D)
1940
1948-1953
1954-1957
1958-1962
North Melbourne
North Melbourne
Williamstown
North Melbourne
11 (2)
111 (60)
91 (76)
90 (34)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 1963 season.

Wallace Frances "Wally" Carter (4 February 1909 - 6 June 2001) was an Australian rules footballer who played for and coached North Melbourne in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

Carter made his debut for North Melbourne in 1929 and played with the club for over a decade, winning the inaugural Syd Barker Medal for their best and fairest player in 1937. Towards the end of the 1940 season he acted as caretaker coach but with little success. It was his last season as a player but he would return to the club in 1948 as coach. He acted as coach from 1948 to 1953, and became the first North Melbourne coach to lead the club to a VFL Grand Final.

In 1954, Carter signed to coach Victorian Football Association club Williamstown. He demanded his players train to the same standard as his former VFL club, and led the club into its most successful era. Under Carter's four-year tenure, Williamstown won consecutive premierships in 1954, 1955 and 1956, and was the unbeaten minor premier in 1957 before being eliminated from the finals in straight sets.[1] He was coach of the VFA representative team in 1957.[2]

Carter returned to coach North Melbourne again from 1958 to 1962. During this time he became the first ever person to coach over 200 games for North Melbourne.

He was inducted into the North Melbourne Hall of Fame in 2002. He was named as coach of the Williamstown Team of the Century in 2003, and Was an inaugural inductee in the Williamstown Hall of Fame in 2014.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fiddian, Marc (2003), Seagulls over Williamstown, Williamstown, VIC: Williamstown Football Club, p. 88 
  2. ^ Fiddian 2003, p. 96.
  3. ^ "Williamstown FC Hall of Fame Inductees". Retrieved 11 September 2014. 

External links[edit]