1064 Aethusa

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1064 Aethusa
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 2 August 1926
Designations
MPC designation 1064 Aethusa
Named after
Aethusa cynapium (fool's parsley)[2]
1926 PA · 1962 HF
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 89.30 yr (32617 days)
Aphelion 2.9933 AU (447.79 Gm)
Perihelion 2.0928 AU (313.08 Gm)
2.5431 AU (380.44 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.17704
4.06 yr (1481.3 d)
68.294°
0° 14m 34.944s / day
Inclination 9.5001°
280.58°
20.577°
Earth MOID 1.07958 AU (161.503 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.21988 AU (332.089 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.403
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
9.33±0.45 km
8.621 h (0.3592 d)
0.3202±0.034
10.6

1064 Aethusa, provisional designation 1926 PA, is a main-belt asteroid, discovered by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory on 2 August 1926. It is orbiting the Sun in a distance of 2.09−2.99 AU, measures about 19 kilometers in diameter, and has a high geometric albedo of 0.32.[1]

Measurements made with the IRAS observatory give a diameter of 20.64 ± 1.37 km and a geometric albedo of 0.27 ± 0.03. By comparison, the MIPS photometer on the Spitzer Space Telescope gives a diameter of 8.621 ± 4.28 km and a geometric albedo of 0.17 ± 0.04.[3] Other photometric observations of the asteroid collected during 2006 show a rotation period of 8.621 ± 0.004 hours with a brightness variation of 0.18 ± 0.02 magnitude.[4]

The asteroid is named after a genus in the carrot family, "Aethusa", of which the plant Aethusa cynapium (fool's parsley) is the only member.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1064 Aethusa (1926 PA)" (2015-08-30 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1064) Aethusa. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 91. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  3. ^ Ryan, Erin Lee; et al. (April 2012), "The Kilometer-Sized Main Belt Asteroid Population as Revealed by Spitzer", eprint arXiv, arXiv:1204.1116free to read, Bibcode:2012arXiv1204.1116R. 
  4. ^ Warner, Brian D. (December 2006), "Asteroid lightcurve analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - March - June 2006", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 33 (4): 85–88, Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...85W. 

External links[edit]