1911 Schubart

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1911 Schubart
Discovery [1]
Discovered by P. Wild
Discovery site Zimmerwald Obs.
Discovery date 25 October 1973
Designations
MPC designation 1911 Schubart
Named after
Joachim Schubart (astronomer)[2]
1973 UD · 1928 DW
1933 UX1 · 1941 SU1
1951 AH1 · 1952 DS2
1960 EF · 1968 FM
1972 RO · 1972 TY4
main-belt (outer)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 88.05 yr (32160 days)
Aphelion 4.6622 AU (697.46 Gm)
Perihelion 3.3123 AU (495.51 Gm)
3.9873 AU (596.49 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.16929
7.96 yr (2908.1 d)
61.426°
0° 7m 25.644s / day
Inclination 1.6404°
285.08°
182.43°
Earth MOID 2.32888 AU (348.395 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 0.49539 AU (74.109 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.030
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 80.09±2.0 km
Mean radius
40.045 ± 1 km
0.0249 ± 0.001
BV = 0.701 mag
UB = 0.217 mag
Tholen = P
10.11

1911 Schubart, provisional designation 1973 UD, is an outer main-belt asteroid discovered on October 25, 1973, by Paul Wild at Zimmerwald Observatory, near Bern, Switzerland.[1]

With an diameter of 80 kilometers, it is one of the largest members of the Hilda family asteroids, which are in 3:2 orbital resonance with the gas-giant Jupiter. It is also the largest and name-giving body of the Schubart family, a collisional subgroup with related orbits, believed to have originated from a previously existing, larger asteroid (also see Asteroid family).[3] It is the darkest P-type asteroid with a very low geometric albedo of 0.0249.[1]

The asteroid is named in honor of German astronomer Joachim Schubart, from the Astronomisches Rechen-Institut. He developed an averaging techniques for observing the long-term motions of minor planets, which he applied to study in detail the members of the Hilda family.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1911 Schubart (1973 UD)" (2015-06-09 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 19 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1911) Schubart. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 153. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 
  3. ^ Brož, M.; Vokrouhlický, D. (October 2008), "Asteroid families in the first-order resonances with Jupiter", Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: 715–732, arXiv:1104.4004Freely accessible, Bibcode:2008MNRAS.390..715B, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.13764.x 

External links[edit]