1965 college football season

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During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The "writers' poll" by Associated Press (AP) was the most popular, followed by the "coaches' poll" by United Press International) (UPI). Prior to 1965, both services issued their final polls at the close of the regular season, but before teams competed in bowl games. For the 1965 season, the AP took its final poll after the postseason games, an arrangement made permanent in 1968. The Associated Press presented the "AP Trophy" to the winner.

The AP poll in 1965 consisted of the votes of 55 sportswriters, each of whom would give their opinion of the ten best teams. Under a point system of ten points for first place, nine for second, etc., the "overall" ranking was determined. In the preseason poll for 1965, the writers cast first place votes for nine different teams, and the range of points between the highest six finishers ranged from 252 to 311 points. Nebraska was first, followed by Texas, Notre Dame, Michigan, Alabama, and Arkansas.[3] As the regular season progressed, new polls were issued weekly on Mondays.

At season's end, Michigan State, Arkansas, and Nebraska were all unbeaten at 10–0. As champions of their respective conferences (Big Ten, Southwest, and Big Eight), they played in three separate bowl games (Rose, Cotton, and Orange) on New Year's Day. Arkansas and Michigan State lost during the day, and Alabama defeated Nebraska at night in Miami. In the final poll, taken after the bowls, Alabama was crowned the national champion by the Associated Press. The Crimson Tide had been first in both final polls at the end of the 1964 regular season and crowned as national champions, but lost the Orange Bowl.

In addition to 1964 and 1965, the UPI national champions in 1970 and 1973 also lost their respective bowl games. Beginning with the 1974 season, the UPI released its final poll after the bowls.

Rule changes[edit]

  • Free substitution is now permitted only on changes of possession, which brought back the two-platoon system to college football.
  • A two-inch (5 cm) kicking tee was allowed for kickoffs; this was reduced to one-inch (2½ cm) in 2006.

Conference and program changes[edit]

School 1964 Conference 1965 Conference
East Carolina Pirates Independent Southern
Detroit Titans Independent dropped program
VPI Hokies Southern Independent

The AP Regular Season Poll[edit]

In the preseason poll released on September 13, the top five teams were from different conferences. First place was the Nebraska Cornhuskers (Big 8) followed by Texas (Southwest), independent Notre Dame, Michigan of the Big Ten and Alabama from the Southeastern Conference (SEC). Arkansas, the SWC rival to Texas, was #6, followed by USC from the AAWU (later Pacific-8, Pac-10, and now Pac-12).

September[edit]

In Week One (September 18) Alabama and USC both fell out of the Top Ten. USC played Minnesota to a 20–20 tie on a Friday night game in Los Angeles while #5 Alabama narrowly lost to Georgia, 18–17. #1 Nebraska beat Texas Christian (TCU) at home, 34–14. #2 Texas shut out Tulane 31–0 in a game which was shifted from New Orleans to Austin due to the devastation of Hurricane Betsy across the Crescent City. #3 Notre Dame crushed California 48–6 at Berkeley, and #4 Michigan won 31–24 at North Carolina. Following the 48–6 win, Notre Dame rose to #1 in the next poll, Nebraska and Texas fell to 2nd and 3rd, Michigan stayed at fourth and Arkansas (which had beaten Oklahoma State 28–14) was fifth. Michigan State defeated UCLA 13–3 at East Lansing and was seventh.

On September 25, #1 Notre Dame stayed in Indiana as it lost to #6 Purdue 25–21 at West Lafayette. #2 Nebraska won 27–17 over Air Force in Colorado Springs, and #3 Texas beat Texas Tech 33–7. #4 Michigan barely won over unranked California 10–7 and #5 Arkansas 20–12 defeated Tulsa. In next poll, Texas, Purdue and Nebraska had had 15, 14 and 13 first place votes in a tight race for #1, #2 and #3. Arkansas rose to fourth, while the LSU Tigers, coming from a 42–14 win over Rice, placed fifth. Michigan State rose to sixth, while Michigan and Notre Dame fell to seventh and eighth place respectively.

October[edit]

October 2, #1 Texas hosted Indiana and won 27–12; Purdue played SMU to a 14–14 tie in Dallas. #3 Nebraska shut out Iowa State 44–0, while #4 Arkansas blanked TCU 28–0. In an SEC matchup at Gainesville, visiting #5 LSU fell to the Florida Gators 14–7. #10 Georgia beat #7 Michigan 15–7 in Ann Arbor and climbed into the top five, while Michigan State beat Illinois at home, 22–12. The next poll was 1.Texas 2.Nebraska 3.Arkansas 4.Georgia and 5.Michigan State

In October 9 play, all five of the top teams remained unbeaten. #1 Texas shut out Oklahoma, 19–0 at Dallas. #2 Nebraska held visiting Wisconsin scoreless 37–0. #3 Arkansas won at Baylor 38–7 and #4 Georgia beat Clemson at home, 23–9. #5 Michigan State followed Georgia's visit to Ann Arbor with one of its own, beating Michigan 24–7. The Spartans and Bulldogs traded places in the next poll, which was 1.Texas 2.Nebraska 3.Arkansas 4.Michigan State 5.Georgia

On October 16 the #1 Texas met the #3 Arkansas at Fayetteville in a Southwest Conference matchup between the two 4–0 teams and Arkansas won, 27–24. Meanwhile, #2 Nebraska recorded its third straight shutout, a 41–0 win at Kansas State. In a game that ultimately decided the Big Ten title, #4 Michigan State beat Ohio State 32–7, and #5 Georgia lost 10–3 to Florida State at Tallahassee. Arkansas was the new #1 in the poll that followed, followed by Michigan State and Nebraska. The USC Trojans, who had beaten Stanford 14–0 and remained unbeaten (4–0–1) were #4 while Texas dropped from first to fifth.

October 23: The #1 Arkansas defeated North Texas State 55–20 at Little Rock, #2 Michigan State won 14–10 at Purdue, and #3 Nebraska beat Colorado 38-13. #4 USC fell 28–7 to #7 Notre Dame at South Bend, and #5 Texas lost its second straight game, falling 20–17 to Rice. After its 4–0 start, the Longhorns finished the season at 6–4. In the next poll, Michigan State received fewer first place votes than Arkansas, but had seven more points overall, 473–466, while Nebraska was third. The three teams were the last to remain unbeaten, all with 6–0 records. Notre Dame was fourth, and LSU, 5–1 after beating South Carolina 21–7, rose from ninth to fifth.

October 30 #1 Michigan State overwhelmed Northwestern 49–7 at home in East Lansing. Playing in Little Rock, #2 Arkansas shut out Texas A&M 31–0. #3 Nebraska won a close one, 16–14, at Missouri and #4 Notre Dame won 29–3 over Navy. #5 LSU was shut out at home by Mississippi, 23–0. Meanwhile, #10 Alabama beat Mississippi State 10–7 at Jackson to take LSU's place at #5. The top four stayed the same: 1.Michigan State 2.Arkansas 3.Nebraska 4.Notre Dame 5.Alabama.

November[edit]

On November 6, #1 Michigan State won 35–0 win at Iowa, #2 Arkansas won 31–0 at Rice, and #3 Nebraska won 42–6 over Kansas. All three remained unbeaten, with 8–0 records. #4 Notre Dame rolled over host Pittsburgh 69–13, and #5 Alabama won 31–7 at LSU to take the SEC title.

November 13 The top three extended their records to 9–0. #1 Michigan State beat Indiana 27–13 to guarantee itself the Big Ten title and the trip to Pasadena. #2 Arkansas beat SMU 24–3 at Dallas, with only one game left in SWC play, a match against second place Texas Tech. #3 Nebraska had a surprisingly difficult game against 1–6 Oklahoma State, winning 21–17 at Stillwater. #4 Notre Dame shut out visiting North Carolina, 17–0, and #5 Alabama beat South Carolina 35–14 at home.

November 20: With its Big Ten title assured, #1 Michigan State visited its most difficult opponent yet, #4 Notre Dame, with hopes of finishing its season unbeaten. The Spartans won, 12–3. Though unbeaten, #2 Arkansas was only a game ahead of SWC rival Texas Tech (6–0 vs. 5–1) in conference play. The two met at Arkansas, and the Razorbacks beat the Red Raiders 42–24 to get a spot in the Cotton Bowl. In Los Angeles, #7 UCLA beat #6 USC 20–16 to win the AAWU (Pac-8) title and the right to meet Michigan State in the Rose Bowl. Unranked LSU destroyed Tulane 62–0 (the third time in the past eight meetings the Tigers defeated the Green Wave by that score) and earned the berth in the Cotton Bowl opposite Arkansas.

Thanksgiving Day, #3 Nebraska beat Oklahoma at home in Lincoln, 21–9 to gain the Big 8 title and the Orange Bowl spot. #5 Alabama and Auburn University both met in their annual season closer at Birmingham on Saturday and the Crimson Tide beat the Tigers 30–3.

On the following December 4 #4 UCLA lost to Tennessee 37–34 in a game marred by a questionable pass interference call and the clock stopping for no apparent reason during Tennessee's last minute drive. The next AP poll was 1.Michigan State 2.Arkansas 3.Nebraska 4.Alabama and 5.Tennessee. For the first time, the Associated Press made plans to take its final poll after the bowl games, as its top six teams were all playing on New Year's Day.

Conference standings[edit]

The following is an incomplete list of conference standings:

1965 AAWU football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#4 UCLA $ 4 0 0     8 2 1
#10 USC 4 1 0     7 2 1
Washington State 2 1 0     7 3 0
Washington 4 3 0     5 5 0
Stanford 2 3 0     6 3 1
California 2 3 0     5 5 0
Oregon State 1 3 0     5 5 0
Oregon 0 5 0     4 5 1
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1965 ACC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
NC State + 5 2 0     6 4 0†
Clemson + 5 2 0     5 4 0†
Duke 4 2 0     6 4 0
Maryland 3 3 0     4 6 0
North Carolina 3 3 0     4 6 0
Virginia 3 3 0     4 6 0†
Wake Forest 2 4 0     3 7 0†
South Carolina 0 6 0     5 5 0†
  • + – Conference co-champions
  • † South Carolina forfeited its 4 conference wins (Clemson, NC State, Virginia, Wake Forest) due to an ineligible player. This moved Clemson and NC State to 5–2, making them co-Champions. Overall records do not reflect this.[4]
Rankings from AP Poll[5]
1965 Big 8 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#5 Nebraska $ 7 0 0     10 1 0
#6 Missouri 6 1 0     8 2 1
Colorado 4 2 1     6 2 2
Iowa State 3 3 1     5 4 1
Oklahoma 3 4 0     3 7 0
Oklahoma State 2 5 0     3 7 0
Kansas 2 5 0     2 8 0
Kansas State 0 7 0     0 10 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1965 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#2 Michigan State $ 7 0 0     10 1 0
Ohio State 6 1 0     7 2 0
Purdue 5 2 0     7 2 1
Minnesota 5 2 0     5 4 1
Illinois 4 3 0     6 4 0
Northwestern 3 4 0     4 6 0
Michigan 2 5 0     4 6 0
Wisconsin 2 5 0     2 7 1
Indiana 1 6 0     2 8 0
Iowa 0 7 0     1 9 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
Template:1965 Ivy League football standings
1965 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#1 Alabama $ 6 1 1     9 1 1
Auburn 4 1 1     5 5 1
Florida 4 2 0     7 4 0
#7 Tennessee 3 1 2     8 1 2
Ole Miss 5 3 0     7 4 0
#8 LSU 3 3 0     8 3 0
Kentucky 3 3 0     6 4 0
Georgia 3 3 0     6 4 0
Vanderbilt 1 5 0     2 7 1
Tulane 1 5 0     2 8 0
Mississippi State 1 5 0     4 6 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1965 Southern Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
West Virginia $   4 0         6 4  
William & Mary   5 1         6 4  
East Carolina   3 1         9 1  
VMI   3 2         3 7  
George Washington   4 3         5 5  
Davidson   2 3         6 4  
Furman   2 3         5 5  
The Citadel   2 6         2 8  
Richmond   0 6         0 10  
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1965 Southwest Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#3 Arkansas $ 7 0 0     10 1 0
Texas Tech 5 2 0     8 3 0
TCU 5 2 0     6 5 0
Texas 3 4 0     6 4 0
Baylor 3 4 0     5 5 0
SMU 3 4 0     4 5 1
Texas A&M 1 6 0     3 7 0
Rice 1 6 0     2 8 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1965 WAC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
BYU $ 4 1 0     6 4 0
Arizona State 3 1 0     6 4 0
Wyoming 3 2 0     6 4 0
New Mexico 2 3 0     3 7 0
Utah 1 3 0     3 7 0
Arizona 1 4 0     3 7 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1965 NCAA University Division independents football records
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
New Mexico State         8 2 0
Utah State         8 2 0
Xavier         8 2 0
Texas Western         8 3 0
#9 Notre Dame         7 2 1
Southern Miss         7 2 0
Syracuse         7 3 0
VPI         7 3 0
Boston College         6 4 0
West Texas State         6 4 0
Boston University         5 3 1
Buffalo         5 3 2
Miami (FL)         5 4 1
Penn State         5 5 0
Memphis State         5 5 0
San Jose State         5 5 0
Navy         4 4 2
Colgate         4 5 1
Florida State         4 5 1
Army         4 5 1
Houston         4 5 1
Colorado State         4 6 0
Rutgers         3 6 0
Air Force         3 6 1
Pittsburgh         3 7 0
Dayton         3 7 0
Holy Cross         2 7 1
Pacific (CA)         2 8 0
Villanova         1 8 0
Rankings from AP Poll

Bowl games[edit]

Major bowls[edit]

Saturday, January 1, 1966

BOWL
COTTON LSU Tigers 14 #2 Arkansas Razorbacks 7
SUGAR #6 Missouri Tigers 20 Florida Gators 18
ROSE #5 UCLA Bruins 14 #1 Michigan State Spartans 12
ORANGE #4 Alabama Crimson Tide 39 #3 Nebraska Cornhuskers 28

The top three teams in the polls were upset,[6] starting with LSU's 14–7 win over #2 Arkansas in the Cotton Bowl. Then came an even bigger stunner, as 13-point underdog UCLA bested top-ranked Michigan State in the Rose Bowl, 14–12. Trailing by eight points, Michigan State scored a touchdown in the final minute but the two-point conversion attempt to tie was stopped just short of the goal line. With the top two teams defeated, the Orange Bowl game that night between #3 Nebraska and #4 Alabama would determine the national champion. Alabama, led by QB Steve Sloan, beat Nebraska 39–28 to claim the national title.[7] The final AP poll, released three days after the bowls, was #1 Alabama, #2 Michigan State, #3 Arkansas, #4 UCLA, and #5 Nebraska.[8][9]

Other bowls[edit]

BOWL Location Date Winner Score Runner-up
SUN El Paso, TX December 31 Texas Western 13–12 TCU
GATOR Jacksonville, FL December 31 Georgia Tech 31–21 #10 Texas Tech
BLUEBONNET Houston, TX December 18 #7 Tennessee 27–6 Tulsa
LIBERTY Memphis, TN December 18 Mississippi 13–7 Auburn
  • Prior to the 1975 season, the Big Ten and Pac-8 (AAWU) conferences allowed only one postseason participant each, for the Rose Bowl.
  • Notre Dame did not play in the postseason for 44 consecutive seasons (19251968).

Other champions[edit]

College Division[edit]

Prior to 1973, the NCAA was divided into two divisions, University and College. Many of the schools that are now in Division I FCS were ranked in the "small college poll," taken by both the UPI (coaches) and AP (a panel of writers) at the end of the regular season. The postseason consisted of four bowls as regional finals, played on December 11.

In 1965, both services ranked the North Dakota State Bison (10–0) first; the UPI coaches' poll had Los Angeles State (8–1) second, while the AP poll had Middle Tennessee State (10–0), as the #2 team.[10] #1 NDSU beat another future FCS school, Grambling, 20–7 in the Pecan Bowl in Abilene, Texas.[11][12]

College Division bowls[edit]

Saturday, December 11, 1965

Bowl Location Winner Score Runner-up
Tangerine Orlando, FL East Carolina 31–0 Maine
Pecan Abilene, TX North Dakota State 20–7 Grambling (LA)
Grantland Rice Murfreesboro, TN Tennessee State 14–14 Ball State (IN)
Camellia Sacramento, CA Los Angeles State 18–0 UC Santa Barbara

Source:[11][13][14]

Conference standings[edit]

1965 Big Sky football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Weber State + 3 1 0     8 1 0
Idaho + 3 1 0     5 5 0
Montana 2 2 0     4 6 0
Idaho State 1 3 0     3 5 1
Montana State 1 3 0     3 7 0
  • + – Conference co-champions
  • No Big Sky teams advanced to postseason

NAIA[edit]

In the NAIA championship game, the St. John's Johnnies defeated the Linfield Wildcats, 33–0. Both schools now compete in NCAA Division III.

Minor conference champions[edit]

Conference Champion Record
Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association Albion 5–0–0

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.jhowell.net/cf/cf1965.htm
  2. ^ http://www.appollarchive.com/football/ap/seasons.cfm?appollid=296
  3. ^ http://www.appollarchive.com/football/ap/
  4. ^ "ACC Champions". 2007 Football Media Guide. Atlantic Coast Conference. p. 93. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 10, 2011. Retrieved January 24, 2013. 
  5. ^ "1965 Atlantic Coast Conference Year Summary". sports-reference.com. Retrieved January 24, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Grid bowl results". Youngstown Vindicator. (Ohio). Associated Press. January 2, 1966. p. D1. 
  7. ^ "39-28 win for 'Bama in Miami". Youngstown Vindicator. (Ohio). Associated Press. January 2, 1966. p. D1. 
  8. ^ "'Bama wins 2nd straight AP grid title". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. January 4, 1966. p. 2B. 
  9. ^ http://www.databasefootball.com/College/polls/appoll.htm?PollID=791
  10. ^ "Pecan Bowl-Bound Bisons No. 1," Abilene Reporter-News, November 24, 1965, p4-A
  11. ^ a b "Pecan Bowl to N. Dakota State 20 to 7,". Chicago Tribune. Associated Press. December 12, 1965. p. 4, section 2. 
  12. ^ "Bisons win Pecan Bowl". Youngstown Vindicator. (Ohio). Associated Press. December 12, 1965. p. D1. 
  13. ^ "East Carolina whips Maine 31-0, in Tangerine Bowl". Youngstown Vindicator. (Ohio). Associated Press. December 12, 1965. p. D1. 
  14. ^ "Rice Bowl rivals tie". Youngstown Vindicator. (Ohio). Associated Press. December 12, 1965. p. D2.