1999–2000 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team

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1999–2000 Princeton Tigers men's basketball
Conference Ivy League
1999–2000 record 19–11 (11–3, 2nd Ivy)
Head coach Bill Carmody
Captain Mason Rocca
Captain Chris Young
Home arena Jadwin Gymnasium
Seasons

The 1999–2000 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team represented the Princeton University in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1999–2000 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The head coach was Bill Carmody and the team co-captains were Mason Rocca and Chris Young.[1] The team played its home games in the Jadwin Gymnasium on the University campus in Princeton, New Jersey, and was the runner-up of the Ivy League. The team earned an invitation to the 32-team 2000 National Invitation Tournament.[2]

Using the Princeton offense, the team recovered from a 1–4 start and posted a 19–11 overall record and an 11–3 conference record.[1] On December 18, 1999, against UAB Blazers, Spencer Gloger made 10 three-point field goals in a singe game to tie Matt Maloney's current Ivy League record with a total that continues to stand as the highest total by an Ivy League player against a non-league foe.[3][4] In the National Invitation Tournament the team lost its first round contest against the Penn State Nittany Lions at Bryce Jordan Center State College, Pennsylvania, on March 15 by a 55–41 score.[1][5][6]

The team was led by All-Ivy League first team selection Chris Young.[2] The team won the twelfth of twelve consecutive national statistical championships in scoring defense with a 54.6 points allowed average.[7] Young led the Ivy League in field goal percentage with a 55.3% average in conference games.[3] He also led the conference in blocked shots with 90, which continues to be the second highest single-season total in league history.[8]

This was the last season as coach for Carmody who gave way to John Thompson III the following year.[1] Carmody helped Princeton achieve a 76.1% (210–66) winning percentage for the decade of the 1990s, which was the eighth best in the nation.[9] Carmody retired with the Ivy League's all-time highest winning percentage in all games (78.6%, 92–25), surpassing Butch van Breda Kolff's 76.9% mark, and in conference games (89.3%, 50–6), surpassing Chuck Daly's 88.1% mark.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Men's Basketball Record Book • All-Time Results". GoPrincetonTigers.com. Princeton Athletic Communications. June 12, 2009. Retrieved September 27, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b 2009-10 Ivy League Basketball Media Guide. IvyLeagueSports.com. p. 40. 
  3. ^ a b 2009-10 Ivy League Basketball Media Guide. IvyLeagueSports.com. p. 49. 
  4. ^ "Colleges: Men's Basketball; Xavier Upsets the Top-Ranked Bearcats". The New York Times. December 19, 1999. Retrieved October 5, 2010. 
  5. ^ "College Basketball: Men's N.I.T.; Georgetown Wins In Triple Overtime". The New York Times. March 16, 2000. Retrieved October 5, 2010. 
  6. ^ Princeton Athletic Communications (June 22, 2009). "Men's Basketball Record Book • Men's Basketball in the Postseason". GoPrincetonTigers.com. Princeton University. Retrieved September 30, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 48. Retrieved October 2, 2010. 
  8. ^ 2009-10 Ivy League Basketball Media Guide. IvyLeagueSports.com. p. 54. 
  9. ^ "Division I Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 58. Retrieved October 4, 2010. 
  10. ^ 2009-10 Ivy League Basketball Media Guide. IvyLeagueSports.com. p. 56.