2-Methyltridecane

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2-Methyltridecane
2-Methyltridecane-2D-skeletal.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
2-Methyltridecane
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C14H30/c1-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14(2)3/h14H,4-13H2,1-3H3
    Key: CJBFZKZYIPBBTO-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC(C)CCCCCCCCCCC
Properties
C14H30
Molar mass 198.394 g·mol−1
Melting point −21 °C (252 K)[1]
Boiling point 121.5 °C (394.6 K)(12 Torr)[2]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

2-Methyltridecane is an organic compound with chemical formula C14H30. It is an isomer of tetradecane. It can be produced by reducing 2,2-dimethyl-3-decylthiirane.[3] Metallic lanthanum in tetrahydrofuran can reduce 2-iodo-2-methyltridecane into 2-methyltridecane. In this reaction, the byproducts include 12,12,13,13-tetramethyltetracosane and some alkenes.[4] Adding hydrogen to 13-bromo-2-methyldecan-2-ol can produce some 2-methyltridecane. This reaction is catalyzed by Raney nickel.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Petrov, A. D. Synthesis and properties of branched C12-C24 paraffins. Doklady - Akademiya Nauk Azerbaidzhanskoi SSR, 1955. 11 (11): 747-755. ISSN 0002-3078.
  2. ^ Petrov, Al. A.; Sergienko, S. R.; Nechitailo, N. A.; Tsedilina, A. L. Synthesis and properties of monomethyl alkanes of composition C12-16. Izvestiya Akademii Nauk SSSR, Seriya Khimicheskaya, 1959. 1091-1097. ISSN 0002-3353.
  3. ^ J.R. Schauder, J.N. Denis, A. Krief (1983). "Reduction of thiiranes to alkenes and alkanes". Tetrahedron Letters. 24 (15): 1657–1660. doi:10.1016/S0040-4039(00)81737-2. Retrieved 2020-06-10.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  4. ^ Toshiki Nishino, Toshihisa Watanabe, Mitsuo Okada, Yutaka Nishiyama, Noboru Sonoda (February 2002). "Reduction of Organic Halides with Lanthanum Metal: A Novel Generation Method of Alkyl Radicals". The Journal of Organic Chemistry. 67 (3): 966–969. doi:10.1021/jo016205n. ISSN 0022-3263. PMID 11856045. Retrieved 2020-06-10.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. ^ Marie E. Krafft, William J. Crooks (January 1988). "Deoxygenation of tertiary alcohols using Raney nickel". The Journal of Organic Chemistry. 53 (2): 432–434. doi:10.1021/jo00237a041. ISSN 0022-3263. Retrieved 2020-06-10.