(471288) 2011 GM27

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from 2011 GM27)
Jump to: navigation, search
2011 GM27
Discovery[1]
Discovery site La Silla Obs. (809)
Discovery date 2 April 2011
Designations
MPC designation 2011 GM27
TNO · cubewano
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 4
Observation arc 3308 days (9.06 yr)
Aphelion 45.277 AU (6.7733 Tm)
Perihelion 42.628 AU (6.3771 Tm)
43.953 AU (6.5753 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.030132
291.40 yr (106434 d)
70.965°
0° 0m 12.177s /day
Inclination 13.033°
257.17°
214.93°
Earth MOID 41.6532 AU (6.23123 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 37.4516 AU (5.60268 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 446 km (assumed)[3]
0.06 (assumed)[3]
5.2[2]

(471288) 2011 GM27 is a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) in the Kuiper belt. It orbits slightly outside a 3:5 resonance with Neptune, taking 16 years (5.5% of its orbit) longer to orbit the Sun than a body in 3:5 resonance. It was discovered on 2 April 2011 at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. With an absolute magnitude of 5.2,[2] it is probably a dwarf planet, as its diameter has been roughly estimated to be about 450 kilometers based on an assumed geometric albedo of 0.06.[3] It has a Tisserand's parameter relative to Jupiter of 5.771.[2] Precovery observations exist dating back to 2006 in SDSS data.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2011 GM27". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 23 October 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2011 GM27)" (2015-01-28 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 31 March 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Archived from the original on 2011-10-18. Retrieved 2012-08-31. 
  4. ^ "On the discovery and precovery of Trans-Neptunian Objects from SDSS images". talk.galaxyzoo.org. pp. 1–2. Retrieved 8 March 2015. 

External links[edit]