2090 Mizuho

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2090 Mizuho
Discovery [1]
Discovered by T. Urata
Discovery site Yakiimo Station
Discovery date 12 March 1978
Designations
MPC designation 2090 Mizuho
Named after
Mizuho Urata
(daughter of discoverer)[2]
1978 EA · 1937 RE
1942 PG · 1951 EH
1952 HA4 · 1953 RT
1953 TP · 1959 VD
1964 TE · 1970 WV
1978 EJ
main-belt · (outer)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 65.02 yr (23747 days)
Aphelion 3.4860 AU (521.50 Gm)
Perihelion 2.6689 AU (399.26 Gm)
3.0774 AU (460.37 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.13277
5.40 yr (1971.9 d)
228.47°
0° 10m 57.252s / day
Inclination 11.818°
339.87°
340.47°
Earth MOID 1.6579 AU (248.02 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.8656 AU (279.09 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.183
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 18.92±0.79 km[4]
18.185±0.117 km[5]
35.28 km (calculated)[3]
5.47 h (0.228 d)[1][6]
0.207±0.019[4]
0.2154±0.0435[5]
0.057 (assumed)[3]
B–V = 0.871
U–B = 0.499
Tholen = SS[3]
10.99

2090 Mizuho, provisional designation 1978 EA, is a stony asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, about 18 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Japanese astronomer Takeshi Urata at the JCPM Yakiimo Station in Shimizu, Japan on 12 March 1978.[7]

The S-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.7–3.5 AU once every 5.41 years (1,974 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.13 and is tilted by 12 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It takes about 5.47 hours to rotate around its axis.[6] The S-type asteroid has a geometric albedo of 0.21 as measured by the Akari and NEOWISE surveys.[4][5]

The discoverer named the minor planet after his daughter, Mizuho Urata.[2] It was the first asteroid in over 50 years to be discovered by a non-professional astronomer, which set off a wave of interest in amateur asteroid discovery, especially in Japan.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2090 Mizuho (1978 EA)" (2015-05-26 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 17 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2090) Mizuho. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 169. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 10 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (2090) Mizuho". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 10 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 10 November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407free to read. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 10 November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Brinsfield, James W. (October 2010). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Via Capote Observatory: 2010 February-May". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 37 (4): 146–147. Bibcode:2010MPBu...37..146B. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 10 November 2015. 
  7. ^ "2090 Mizuho (1978 EA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 10 November 2015. 
  8. ^ Kosai, H.; Urata, T.; Nakamura, T. (December 1993). "Activities of Asteroid Studies by Amateur Astronomers in Japan". Seventy-five (75) years of Hirayama asteroid families: The role of collisions in the solar system history. Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series. 63; Proceedings of the international conference; held November 29-December 3; 1993 at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) at Sagamihara near Tokyo; Japan; San Francisco: Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP). Bibcode:1994ASPC...63..297K. Retrieved 10 November 2015. 

External links[edit]