2934 Aristophanes

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2934 Aristophanes
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Palomar–Leiden survey
C. J. van Houten, I. van Houten-Groeneveld
T. Gehrels
Discovery site Palomar Obs.
Discovery date 25 September 1960
Designations
MPC designation (2934) Aristophanes
Named after
Aristophanes[2]
4006 P–L · 1971 OQ1
1977 RM5 · 1980 FC9
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 54.88 yr (20044 days)
Aphelion 3.3299 AU (498.15 Gm)
Perihelion 3.0088 AU (450.11 Gm)
3.1694 AU (474.14 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.050658
5.64 yr (2060.9 d)
354.68°
0° 10m 28.848s / day
Inclination 8.7959°
202.24°
89.797°
Earth MOID 2.00885 AU (300.520 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.76815 AU (264.511 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.182
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 27.72 km
Mean radius
13.86 ± 0.7 km
0.0761 ± 0.009
Ch (SMASSII)
11.6

2934 Aristophanes, alternatively designated 4006 P–L, is a 28-kilometer sized main belt asteroid, which was discovered by Cornelis Johannes van Houten, Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld and Tom Gehrels in 1960. It is named after Aristophanes (445–385 B.C.), the ancient Greek comic dramatist.[1][2]

The designation P–L stands for Palomar–Leiden, named after Palomar Observatory and Leiden Observatory, which collaborated on the fruitful Palomar–Leiden survey in the 1960s. Gehrels used Palomar's 48-inch Samuel Oschin telescope and shipped the photographic plates to Cornelis Johannes van Houten and Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld at Leiden Observatory. The trio are credited with several thousand asteroid discoveries.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2934 Aristophanes (4006 P-L)" (2015-08-11 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2934) Aristophanes". Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2007. p. 241. Retrieved 11 October 2015. 

External links[edit]