2980 Cameron

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2980 Cameron
Discovery [1]
Discovered by S. J. Bus
Discovery site Siding Spring Obs.
Discovery date 2 March 1981
Designations
MPC designation 2980 Cameron
Named after
Alastair Cameron[2]
1981 EU17 · 1977 EL3
1979 SQ7
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 14091 days (38.58 yr)
Aphelion 3.0334 AU (453.79 Gm)
Perihelion 2.1018 AU (314.42 Gm)
2.5676 AU (384.11 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.18142
4.11 yr (1502.8 d)
252.45°
0° 14m 22.38s / day
Inclination 7.2772°
172.25°
254.30°
Earth MOID 1.12812 AU (168.764 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.32697 AU (348.110 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.397
Physical characteristics
13.4

2980 Cameron, provisionally designated 1981 EU17, is a main-belt asteroid discovered by prolific American astronomer Schelte Bus at Siding Spring Observatory, Australia, on March 2, 1981. It orbits the Sun every 4.11 years at a distance of 2.1–3.0 AU.[1]

The asteroid was named after astrophysicist and cosmogonist Alastair G. W. Cameron (1925–2005), who was associate director for theoretical astrophysics at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He was an early advocate of the concepts of a turbulent accretion disk solar nebula, and of the origin of the Moon by a giant impact on the proto-Earth. He also studied the nucleosynthesis in stars and supernovae, and the cosmic abundances of nuclides.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2980 Cameron (1981 EU17)" (2015-07-19 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2980) Cameron. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 245. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved October 2015. 

External links[edit]